A.N.P.T.ES.  Associazione Nazionale Per la Tutela degli Espropriati  Sito 3

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui: Vai alla ricerca personalizzata >
Se vuoi tornare alla HOME del repertorio clicca qui:  Torna alla HOME >
Per tornare indietro: Usa il tasto indietro del tuo navigatore
CASO: CASE OF PHILIPPOU v. CYPRUS
TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza NUMERO: 71148/10/2016 DATA: 14/06/2016
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media) STATO: Cipro ORGANO: Sezione Terza
ARTICOLI: 35,06,P1-1
 
TESTO ORIGINALE TESTO TRADOTTO

AVVISO IMPORTANTE
da leggere con attenzione prima di esaminare la sentenza

Le sentenze della Corte Europea sono liberamente disponibili sul sito ufficiale della Corte.

La Corte Europea, pero',   pronuncia le sue sentenze soltanto in lingua francese ed a volte in lingua inglese.


Per consentire agli espropriati che non conoscono queste lingue di avere un'idea di cio' che dice la Corte Europea, l'Associazione ha attivato un software di traduzione automatica delle sentenze; molte delle sentenze segnalate agli espropriati sono, quindi,  tradotte prevalentemente con programmi di traduzione automatica che, sebbene di qualita' molto elevata, servono soltanto a dare  un'idea di cio' che dice la Corte Europea a chi non conosce la lingua.
Chi fosse interessato ad un documento perfettamente tradotto, deve rivolgersi ad un traduttore specializzato in testi giuridici; se non ne dispone, puo' chiedere all'Associazione di segnalargliene uno; si badi pero' che i testi in italiano, anche se tradotti da un traduttore specializzato, non sono testi ufficiali.


Si ricorda che i testi ufficiali sono esclusivamente quelli in lingua francese o inglese e che gli Avvocati e i Tecnici che assistono gli espropriati devono utilizzarli esclusivamente nelle lingue ufficiali.
 

NOTE
I dati identificativi dei soggetti privati vengono omessi in ottemperanza alle disposizioni di legge (art 52 comma 1 d.lgs. 30 giugno 196, c.d. legge sulla privacy); questo repertorio e' un'appendice dell'opera I Diritti degli Espropriati - quali sono - come evolvono - norme italiane e norme europee - gli obblighi della P.A. - le posizioni dei Giudici, e puo' essere utilizzato senza alcun costo e senza limitazioni.



Conclusions: Remainder inadmissible
No violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions



FORMER THIRD SECTION







CASE OF PHILIPPOU v. CYPRUS

(Application no. 71148/10)









JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG

14 June 2016


Request for referral to the Grand Chamber pending



This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Philippou v. Cyprus,
The European Court of Human Rights (Former Third Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Luis López Guerra, President,
Helena Jäderblom,
George Nicolaou,
Johannes Silvis,
Branko Lubarda,
Pere Pastor Vilanova,
Alena Polá?ková, judges,
and Stephen Phillips, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 24 May 2016,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 71148/10) against the Republic of Cyprus lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Cypriot national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 16 November 2010.
2. The applicant was represented by OMISSIS, lawyers practising in Nicosia. The Cypriot Government (“the Government”) were initially represented by their Agent Mr P. Clerides, Attorney-General of the Republic of Cyprus, and subsequently by Mr C. Clerides, his successor.
3. The applicant alleged that the forfeiture of his pension rights following his dismissal from the public service by the Public Service Commission (“the PSC”) had been in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, and that he had been a victim of discrimination on the basis of his marital status in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 12 and Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
4. On 21 January 2013 these complaints were communicated to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born on 30 August 1949 and lives in Nicosia.
A. Background to the case
6. The applicant was employed at the Department of Lands and Surveys on 1 December 1971. On 1 January 1996 he was promoted to the position of assistant officer and on 2 February 1998 he was authorised by the director of the department to sign payment orders as authorising officer. On 13 May 2002 a complaint was made by the director following an irregularity in a compulsory acquisition case. It emerged from the investigation that a series of cheques had been issued as alleged compensation to owners of land that had been compulsorily acquired, but that the cheques had never reached the payees named on them.
7. A number of criminal proceedings were brought against the applicant and an accomplice. It also appears that a third person was charged but those proceedings were terminated following the filing of a nolle prosequi by the Attorney General. The proceedings against the applicant involved a total of 223 criminal charges.
8. On 18 January 2005 the applicant received concurrent sentences ranging from two to five years’ imprisonment from the Nicosia Assize Court (no. 18115/02) on a plea of guilty, following a plea bargain to twenty-
four charges concerning a number of offences. These included, inter alia, obtaining the amount of 225,643.67 Cyprus pounds (CYP) (approximately 390,000 euros) by false pretences, issuing false documents, forging cheques, abuse of office, and concealment. Part of the agreement reached between the parties was that the applicant would repay the sum of CYP 150,000 (approximately 255,000 euros), and a confiscation order for that sum was issued in respect of his property. In imposing the sentences the Assize Court also took into consideration another eight cases pending against the applicant before it as well as the District Court of Nicosia.
9. The applicant lodged an appeal with the Supreme Court against his sentence (criminal appeal no. 22/05).
10. Following the applicant’s conviction, and having received the Attorney-General’s advisory opinion that the offences committed involved dishonesty or moral turpitude, the PSC instituted disciplinary proceedings against the applicant. Similar proceedings were also instituted against his accomplice, on whom the PSC imposed compulsory retirement pursuant to section 79(1)(i) of the Public Service Law of 1990 (Law 1/1990; hereinafter “the Public Service Law”; see paragraph 43 below).
11. By a letter dated 13 April 2005 the PSC informed the applicant of the Attorney-General’s opinion and invited him to appear before it on 17 May 2005 and to make representations before proceeding with the imposition of a disciplinary penalty.
12. The PSC convened on 17 May 2005. The applicant’s lawyer requested a month to prepare his pleadings, as he had only recently been appointed and in view of the special nature of the case. The PSC granted the request.
13. On 13 June 2005, the applicant, who was represented by a lawyer, was heard by the PSC. He put forward a number of mitigating factors, which included his dire financial situation following suspension from his duties, the fact that he had paid off most of the sum agreed upon with the authorities, the conviction and sentence he had received from the Assize Court, his significant years of service, and the less severe punishment imposed on his accomplice. He also submitted a socio-economic report by the Department of Social Welfare Services.
14. On 13 June 2005 the PSC decided to dismiss the applicant. In its decision the PSC observed that this case had been one of the most serious cases it had been faced with. The conception and planning of the crimes committed showed a well-set-up fraud which had dealt a blow to the prestige and credibility of the procedures of the Department of Lands and Surveys and also to the image of the Public Service in general. The PSC noted that the offences of which the applicant had been convicted included some of the most serious offences against property, as well as abuse of office and concealment. The gravity of the offences was evident from the severity of the sentences applicable under the law, the substantial sum the applicant had secured through his unlawful actions, and the fact that eight more cases pending against him concerning similar offences had been taken into account by the Nicosia Assize Court when imposing sentence. The PSC also pointed out that the applicant had faced 223 charges in total, which was unprecedented for Cyprus and which disclosed the seriousness and the magnitude of the case.
15. In reaching its decision the PSC observed that it had taken into account the circumstances and conditions under which the applicant had committed the offences. He had been authorised to sign payment orders and had been entrusted by the Republic with the important post of promoting cases concerning compulsory acquisition and serving citizens involved in these cases. The applicant, however, did not live up to his responsibilities, exploited his position, and developed his criminal activities with unprecedented effrontery and recklessness. He had been the mastermind, instigator and main executor of the criminal activities.
16. The PSC also noted that it had taken into consideration what had been said by the applicant’s counsel in mitigation, in particular, the applicant’s personal and family circumstances, as well as the fact that he had undertaken to compensate for the damage and/or part of the damage suffered by the Republic as a consequence of his criminal acts. Further, the PSC pointed out that he had been the main protagonist and this had been stressed by the Assize Court when distinguishing the sentence passed on him from that passed on his co-accused.
17. Pursuant to section 79(7) of the Public Service Law (see paragraph 43 below), the disciplinary penalty of dismissal resulted in the forfeiture of the entire applicant’s public service retirement benefits (hereinafter “retirement benefits”). This entailed the loss of a retirement lump sum and a monthly pension.
18. Lastly, the PSC decided that the part of the applicant’s salary that had been withheld during the period of his suspension from service would not be returned to him.
19. Up to the date of his dismissal the applicant had worked for thirty-three years in the public service.
20. On 23 March 2006 the applicant withdrew his appeal.
21. Pursuant to section 79(7) of the Public Service Law (see paragraph 43 below), his wife received a widow’s pension. This amounted to 15,600 euros (EUR) per year.
B. Judicial review proceedings
1. The first-instance proceedings
22. On 26 August 2005 the applicant brought a recourse before the Supreme Court (revisional jurisdiction) under Article 146 of the Constitution, seeking the annulment of the PSC’s decision to dismiss him from the Public Service and of the consequent forfeiture of his pension rights (recourse no. 994/2005).
23. The applicant claimed that the forfeiture of his retirement benefits had been in breach of Article 23 of the Constitution and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. In this respect the applicant argued that his pension rights constituted a “possession”, and that their automatic forfeiture consequent to his dismissal was disproportionate.
24. On 2 April 2007 the Supreme Court, in an ex tempore decision, held that the recourse was admissible. The court observed that the case concerned the discretion of the PSC in deciding on the dismissal, taking into account all relevant parameters and, in particular, the consequences dismissal would have for the applicant. Therefore, the decision on the penalty and the consequences were very closely linked, bringing to the forefront the principle of proportionality as the main aspect of the PSC’s discretion. It was obvious from the PSC’s decision that in exercising its discretion when choosing the penalty to be imposed it had taken into account the automatic, as it considered, by law, loss of retirement benefits. As a result the court concluded that the extreme severity of the case justified, despite its grave repercussions on the applicant’s retirement rights, the penalty of dismissal. If in the end the court were to accept the applicant’s claims, the setting aside of the penalty of dismissal could not be excluded. The Supreme Court therefore concluded that it could continue to examine the merits of the recourse.
25. On 7 May 2007 the Supreme Court dismissed the recourse, but did not award costs against the applicant in view of the nature of the legal issues raised.
26. The Supreme Court, after having ruled that the retirement benefits of a public servant in Cyprus constituted a possession under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, went on to examine whether or not there had been a violation of the applicant’s rights under this provision. Drawing guidance from the Court’s case-law, and in particular the judgments in the case of Azinas v. Cyprus (no. 56679/00, 20 June 2002, and [GC], no. 56679/00, ECHR 2004 III), and the decision in the case of Banfield v. the United Kingdom ((dec.), no. 6223/04, ECHR 2005 XI), the Supreme Court first pointed to those factors which justified the deprivation of the right to property in this case. One such main factor in the court’s view was the gravity of the offences committed. It considered in this respect that the characterisation of the case by the PSC as one of the most serious in its history did not appear to be an exaggeration. The impression given by the offences was such that not only did they entail a well-organised fraud but they also, most importantly, as the PSC asserted, dealt a blow to the prestige and trustworthiness of the administration. The court considered that sentencing the applicant to five years’ imprisonment, as well as dismissing him, did not necessarily exhaust the limits of the discretion of the State to put things right. Besides, as in Azinas, the non-deprivation of pension benefits in the case of a pension plan to which the employee did not make contributions would amount to rewarding the applicant.
27. At the same time, the serious consequences of the applicant’s punishment - a sentence of five years’ imprisonment and dismissal - had also to be considered, particularly the financial difficulties arising from the deprivation of the said rights as an additional “punishment” for the applicant and his family. The court observed that this was an important factor to be taken into account, according to the circumstances of each case. If the deprivation had not been automatic but discretionary within the framework of enacted procedures, as in England, it would have been possible to examine whether there should be a deprivation and to what extent. The court noted in this respect that it would indeed be good for the State to consider seriously the prospect of an amendment to the law so as to make the system more flexible and fairer in each case. Moreover, there was also the fact that the applicant had to a great extent returned the money he had embezzled, a fact which, although the PSC had said that it had taken it into account, did not appear to have affected its decision, since the punishment imposed on the applicant was, of the ten forms provided for, the extreme one of dismissal instead of choosing the second most serious form of punishment, that of compulsory retirement, which would not have entailed the loss of retirement rights.
28. In the end, however, the Supreme Court considered that the fact that the case in question arose and was heard on the basis of a different statutory regime from that in Azinas as regards the consequences of dismissal entailing the loss of pension rights, tilted the scales, albeit slightly, in favour of the Republic. The proviso in section 79(7) that the applicant’s pension from the day of his dismissal would be paid to his wife and dependent children as if he had died on that date reduced for the family the hardship resulting from the dismissal. Despite this, the court observed that it was likely that there would be cases with even more dire consequences for the dismissed employee, such as when there was no wife or dependent children, or their relationship was such that the dismissed employee could not reasonably expect to benefit through them. Nothing, however, had been said to include the present case among those cases, except for the theoretical possibility that his wife could die before the applicant. The court stated that, if matters were otherwise, it was likely that it would have ruled differently.
29. Finally, the Supreme Court stressed that the competent bodies should seriously study the possibility of amending the statutory framework on the basis of the law in force in England, so that deprivation of retirement rights was not automatic but could be looked at with the help of enacted procedures and with the exercise of discretion in order that the PSC might determine, by means of a reasoned decision, the extent to which it was just to forfeit, if at all, in any particular case, according to the individual’s special circumstances and needs. The Supreme Court considered that both the rule of law and the modern conception of individual justice demanded this.
2. Appeal proceedings
30. On 5 June 2007 the applicant lodged an appeal with the Supreme Court (appellate revisional jurisdiction; appeal no. 78/2007). He first challenged the first-instance finding concerning section 79(7) of the Public Service Law. He submitted that this section was contrary to Article 23 of the Cyprus Constitution and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, as the forfeiture of his retirement benefits had been automatic, without the exercise of any discretionary power. In this respect he argued that the first-instance court had applied the proportionality principle incorrectly during the examination of the penalty imposed by the PSC, and therefore had been wrong when it decided that the measure was proportionate and in line with the Convention. Secondly, the applicant claimed that the finding of the first-instance court that the consequences of this decision were reduced because he was married and thus his wife and dependent children would receive a pension, was discriminatory on the ground of marital status and thus in violation of Article 28 of the Constitution.
31. On 12 June 2007 the respondent Government also appealed (appeal no. 81/2007) challenging the first-instance findings (a) that in the present case the retirement benefits could be considered a “possession”; (b) that in the disciplinary dismissal of a public servant there was no enacted framework providing for the exercise of discretion as to whether the retirement benefits would be granted; and (c) that the payment of the pension to the applicant’s wife was the only essential factor which tilted the scales in favour of the Republic.
32. On 18 May 2010 the Supreme Court dismissed both appeals without awarding costs, in view of the importance of the matter raised. It agreed with the first-instance court’s finding that the right to a pension and its conditions constituted a possession of the employee. This right was created by the appointment of the employee. The fact that a pension was given to the wife and dependent children suggested that pension benefits were considered as “property” which could be transferred. In this respect the court referred to its judgment in the case of Pavlou v. the Republic (revisional appeal no. 161/2006, (2009) 3 CLR 1402; see paragraph 46 below) and the Court’s judgment in the case of Apostolakis v. Greece (no. 39574/07, 22 October 2009).
33. The court went on to find, however, that the deprivation of the applicant’s retirement benefits had been justified. In this respect, the court noted that the PSC had chosen the penalty of dismissal under section 79(7) of the Public Service Law, after exercising its discretion and after considering the consequences and the fact that such a penalty was in the public interest. The first-instance court had examined whether the imposition of the penalty of dismissal, which brought about the automatic forfeiture of retirement benefits, was disproportionate. It had examined whether the PSC, when exercising its discretion, had applied the principle of proportionality in deciding on the penalty of dismissal, which itself resulted in the automatic deprivation of retirement rights. In this respect it held that the PSC had exercised its discretion when deciding to impose the penalty of dismissal. The PSC had had a variety of available penalties at its disposal, such as compulsory retirement, which did not bring about the forfeiture of the pension. It decided, however, in view of the offences committed by the applicant, that such deprivation was justified.
34. The Supreme Court pointed out that the European Court of Human Rights had acknowledged that the administration had wide discretion in deciding on such matters.
35. It went on to agree with the first-instance court that the deprivation of the applicant’s retirement benefits had been justified in view of the seriousness of the offences, which had dealt a blow to the trustworthiness and credibility of the administration. The relevant domestic law provision was aimed at discouraging public servants from committing serious offences and at protecting the smooth running of the administration. Section 79(7) of the Public Service Law was not contrary to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, since the deprivation of retirement benefits was not a punishment on its own, but a consequence of the imposition of the penalty of dismissal.
36. The court went on to distinguish the applicant’s case from that of Apostolakis, in which the forfeiture had been automatic following a criminal conviction and had entailed deprivation of both pension and social security rights and therefore of all means of subsistence. In the present case, although the applicant had been deprived of his retirement benefits as a public servant, he had been entitled to receive benefits from the Social Insurance Fund, which were calculated on the basis of contributions made by the employer and the employee. Referring to the Court’s judgment in the case of Wieczorek v. Poland (no. 18176/05, 8 December 2009), it found that the applicant had not been deprived of all means of subsistence.
37. As to the question of discrimination due to marital status, raised by the applicant, the Supreme Court held that the first-instance court’s comments on the matter did not support the applicant’s claim of discrimination. The comments in question had been made on a hypothetical basis and did not apply to the present case.
38. Lastly, the Supreme Court dealt with the remaining grounds of appeal put forward by the Government. It observed that the first-instance decision was to the effect that in the event of dismissal the law did not provide for a procedure concerning the exercise of discretion for forfeiting retirement rights, but it did not say that it was not possible to exercise discretion on the matter, since it recognised that there was a choice between dismissal entailing forfeiture of rights and compulsory retirement, which did not. Finally, it pointed out that the first-instance court had set out in its decision all the facts which it had taken into account in deciding on the proportionality of the forfeiture, and had rightly concluded that the payment of the pension to the wife meant that the deprivation was not disproportionate. The court did not award costs in view of the important issues raised.
C. Other relevant information
39. The applicant has been receiving a social security pension from the Social Insurance Fund since 31 August 2012, when he reached the age of sixty-three. The pension therefore received by his wife pursuant to section 79(7) of the Public Service Law was then reduced by the complementary sum received by him from the Social Insurance Fund. According to a letter dated 28 November 2012 sent to her by State’s Treasury, her pension was reduced by EUR 854,94 per month.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Retirement benefits and disciplinary punishments
40. A public servant’s entitlement to retirement benefits is governed by the Pensions Law, Law 97(1)/97, as amended. The relevant sections, as applicable at the time, provide as follows:
Section 4 (Granting of retirement benefits)
“(1) Any pension, lump sum or gratuity, and other allowances, is granted to state officers of the Cyprus Republic in accordance with the provisions of the present Act.
(2) Any pension, lump sum or gratuity granted under this Act shall be calculated in accordance with the provisions in force on the actual date of the state officer’s retirement.”
Section 5 (charging the Consolidated Fund)
“The Consolidated Fund of the Republic shall be charged with every pension, lump sum, gratuity or other allowance/benefit for which the Republic is liable on the basis of the law”
Section 7 (exemption from income tax)
“Any gratuity and lump sum granted on the basis of the provisions of the Law are exempted from the imposition of income tax.”
41. Furthermore, section 8 of the Pensions Law provides the computation formula for pensions and lump sum payments. The following are the cases specified in section 9, as applicable at the time, which entitled a state employee to, inter alia, a pension and lump sum payment. These were: (a) on reaching the age of compulsory retirement or at any time thereafter; (b) on reaching the age of fifty-five; (c) on the abolition of his/her post; (d) on his/her retirement, to facilitate the organisational improvement of the service to which he/she belongs, which may thus achieve more effective operation of the service, or savings; (e) in case the employee was unable to perform his/her duties by reason of a mental or physical incapacity which was likely to be permanent; (f) in the event of termination of the employee’s services on specialised grounds of public interest in accordance with the relevant applicable law; (g) in the event of his retirement on account of inadequacy or unfitness; (h) in the event of imposition by the competent disciplinary organ of the disciplinary penalty of compulsory retirement; (i) on retirement for reasons of public interest to take some other public office which is incompatible with his/her office or post; (j) on retirement for reasons of public interest to be appointed to a public benefit organisation or local authority; and (k) in the event of voluntary early retirement.
42. Section 45 of the Pensions Law provides for reduction of a pension provided under the provisions of the Law by the equivalent complementary amount which is being paid to a pensioner or in this respect by virtue of the Social Security Laws with regard to insurance payments on which contributions were made after 6 October 1980. For the purposes of sections 5(1) and 88(1) of the Social Security Laws the employee is regarded, with reference to any service other than the service which is taken into consideration in calculating the maximum amount of pension and the amount of gratuity, as not covered by a professional pension scheme.
43. Furthermore, the relevant sections of the Public Service Law (Law 1/1990), as applicable at the time, governing retirement benefits and disciplinary punishment read as follows:
Section 56 (retirement benefits)
(1) The retirement benefits of permanent and pensionable officers are those prescribed by the Pensions Law or any law amending or substituted for the same and any Regulations made thereunder.
(2) The retirement benefits of a monthly-paid officer, who does not belong to the permanent public service and is not serving on contract, shall be prescribed by Regulations made under this Law.”
Section 79 (disciplinary punishments)
“1. In accordance with the present Law, the following disciplinary penalties may be imposed:
(a) reprimand
(b) severe reprimand
(c) disciplinary transfer
(d) interruption of annual salary increase
(e) suspension of annual salary increase
(f) pecuniary penalty, which may not exceed three months’ salary
(g) reduction in salary scales
(h) reduction in rank
(i) compulsory retirement
(j) dismissal.
...
7. Dismissal entails the loss of all retirement benefits.
It is provided that a pension is paid to the wife or dependent children, if any, of a public servant who was dismissed as though he had died on the date of his dismissal and it shall be calculated on the basis of his actual years of service.”
44. It is noted that section 79(1) and (7) of the earlier law, namely, the Public Service Law of 1967 (Law 33/1967), applicable at the time of the applicant’s employment, was the same as that contained in Law 1/1990, save for the last paragraph of section 79(7), which provides for payment of a pension to the dismissed public servant’s family. This amendment was introduced by Law 1/1990.
B. Relevant Constitutional provisions and case-law
45. The relevant Constitutional provisions read as follows:
Article 23
“1. Every person, alone or jointly with others, has the right to acquire, own, possess, enjoy or dispose of any movable or immovable property and has the right to respect for such right. The right of the Republic to underground water, mineral and antiquities is reserved.
2. No deprivation or restriction or limitation of any such right shall be made except as provided in this Article.
3. Restrictions or limitations which are absolutely necessary in the interest of public safety, health or morals, or the town and county planning or the development and utilisation of any property to the promotion of the public benefit or for the protection of the rights of others may be imposed by law on the exercise of such right ....”
Article 166 (1)
“There shall be charged on the Consolidated Fund, in addition to any grant, remuneration or other moneys charged by any other provision of this Constitution or law -
(a) all pensions and gratuities for which the Republic is liable; ...”.
Article 169 (3)
“Treaties, conventions and agreements concluded in accordance with the foregoing provisions of this Article shall have, as from their publication in the official Gazette of the Republic, superior force to any municipal law on condition that such treaties, conventions and agreements are applied by the other party thereto.”
46. The Supreme Court, in the case of Pavlou v. the Republic (Revisional appeal no. 161/2006, (2009) 3 CLR 1402), which concerned the reduction of the State pension upon receipt of an old-age pension from the Social Insurance Fund, held that a pension constituted property and was consequently an individual right that required legal protection.
III. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL MATERIAL
47. The preamble of the Council of Europe’s Criminal Law Convention on Corruption of 27 January 1999 reads, in so far as relevant, as follows:
“Preamble
The member States of the Council of Europe and the other States signatory hereto,
...
Emphasising that corruption threatens the rule of law, democracy and human rights, undermines good governance, fairness and social justice, distorts competition, hinders economic development and endangers the stability of democratic institutions and the moral foundations of society;
...”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
48. The applicant complained that the forfeiture of his retirement benefits following his dismissal from the public service breached Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. The parties’ submissions
1. The Government
49. The Government submitted that the determining question in the case, in the light of the Court’s case-law concerning similar complaints on forfeiture or loss of pension, was whether a fair balance had been struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirement of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights. They noted that, in line with the Court’s case-law, the forfeiture of a retirement pension fell to be considered under the first sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, since it acted neither as a control of use nor as a deprivation of property. In the Government’s view the required fair balance had not been exceeded.
50. The Government, relying on the Court’s decision in the case of Banfield (cited above) pointed out that the State’s entitlement to bring disciplinary proceedings against the applicant in addition to criminal proceedings was not in question: the criminal proceedings related to the breaches of criminal law and the disciplinary proceedings to the applicant’s breach of the relationship of trust which must exist between all employees and their employer. They observed in this respect that the situation in the present case had been the same as in Banfield: the applicant had benefited from procedural protection, and the penalty imposed on him had been a discretionary one.
51. First of all, the disciplinary procedure had commenced following the conclusion of the criminal proceedings. The PSC had transmitted the Assize Court’s judgment to the Attorney-General for an opinion as to whether the offences of which the applicant had been convicted entailed dishonesty and moral turpitude. After receiving the Attorney-General’s opinion, the PSC had afforded the applicant the right to be heard before deciding on the disciplinary penalty.
52. Secondly, the PSC’s decision to dismiss the applicant had been discretionary. This had been evident from both the Supreme Court’s ex tempore decision of 2 April 2007 and its judgment on appeal (see paragraphs 24 and 33 above). The present case was therefore distinguishable from that of Apostolakis (cited above), in which the conviction itself had led to the automatic forfeiture of the pension. Further, unlike in the case of Azinas (cited above), the PSC had taken into account a number of issues when deciding on the penalty, such as the mitigating factors cited by the applicant’s lawyer. These had included his difficult financial situation - a socio-economic report by the Department of Social Welfare Services had been submitted by the applicant - and the fact that his co-accused had received the lighter penalty of compulsory retirement. In exercising its discretion, the PSC had taken account of the fact that the applicant had been the main protagonist and the brains behind the offences committed. Soon after he had been entrusted with the task of signing authorisations for the payment of compensation to members of the public for compulsory acquisitions of their property, he had systematically, over a period of two years, used his position to defraud public funds of substantial amounts for his own personal gain. He had planned the whole scheme, and had executed it with the aid of his co-accused. As a result 223 criminal charges had been brought against him, and the offences of which he had been convicted and sentenced had been very serious. The Government considered that it could be assumed that the applicant had caused considerable damage to the public’s trust in the proper functioning of the Public Service and the honesty of State employees in administering State funds. The PSC had therefore decided to impose the penalty of dismissal, which was the most severe provided by the Public Service Law, as it carried the loss of all retirement benefits specified in section 56 of that Law, as applicable at the time. The Government stressed in this respect that in the case of Banfield (cited above) the Court had stated that it was not inherently unreasonable for provision to be made even for total forfeiture of a pension in suitable cases.
53. Thirdly, the applicant’s retirement pension and lump sum had been entirely publicly funded, the applicant having made no contributions. The forfeiture related to the State’s funding of the pension scheme. No issue therefore arose of forfeiture of contributions made by the applicant. Relying on the case of Klein v. Austria (no. 57028/00, § 57, 3 March 2011), the Government submitted that this was an important factor to take into account. The payment by the Republic of a public service retirement pension without any contribution by its civil servants constituted the employee’s reward for faithful service. If the applicant had received this reward, or part of it, public confidence would have been further shaken. The Government pointed out in this respect that at the time of his dismissal the applicant had been covered by an occupational pension scheme applicable to all State employees. This scheme provided State employees with benefits upon their retirement or resignation from service. In the event of their death the benefits were given to their dependents. The applicant, upon retirement, would have been entitled to an annual pension and a lump sum payment computable in accordance with the provisions of the Pensions Law, as applicable at the time. That law provided that the Republic was obliged to pay those benefits, which were charged to the account of the Republic’s consolidated fund. This was the fund into which, by virtue of the Constitution, all revenues and monies raised or received by the Republic were paid. Had the applicant theoretically retired voluntarily on 13 June 2005, pursuant to section 8 of the Pensions Law (see paragraph 41 above), he would have been entitled to an annual pension amounting to EUR 17,161.65; the lump sum came to EUR 80,087.82.
54. However, in contrast to the Apostolakis case (cited above), the applicant’s loss of retirement benefits had not entailed loss of his social insurance rights, nor had he been deprived of all means of subsistence. At all material times the applicant, like all State employees, had also been compulsorily insured under the Republic’s general Social Insurance Scheme, which covered all employees and entitled them to the payment of a social security pension from the Social Insurance Fund. This pension was funded by employee contributions as well as employer contributions, and its level depended on the amounts that had been contributed. The right to benefits payable from the Social Insurance Fund was not affected in the event of dismissal. Consequently, since 2012, when the applicant reached the age of sixty-three, he had been receiving a social security pension from the Social Insurance Fund amounting to EUR 1,363.98 per month. Although the Government admitted that this amount was slightly less than what he would have been entitled to under the Pensions Law if he had retired voluntarily on 13 June 2005, unlike the applicant in the case of Apostolakis, at the age of fifty-six the applicant still had employment potential.
2. The applicant
55. The applicant submitted, firstly, that it was clear from the domestic judgments and was also common ground between the parties that his pension amounted to a possession within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and that its deprivation constituted an interference with his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. It was the applicant’s position that this interference was unjustified. In this respect he argued that a pension constituted an integral part of the employment contract that the Government offered to all of its employees, namely civil servants. This was evident from the schemes of service provided by the Government. Employment in the civil service came with a general undertaking and a corresponding legitimate expectation that a pension was payable as an integral part of the conditions of service. It was part of the overall employment package which the Government undertook to finance and pay at the end of one’s employment. Consequently, when the applicant’s employment was terminated by the Government he was entitled to his pension.
56. The applicant submitted that the automatic forfeiture of his retirement benefits upon the imposition of the penalty of dismissal had not been in the public interest and could not be considered justified or proportionate. The applicant had pleaded guilty to twenty-four charges in the criminal proceedings and had been sentenced to five years’ imprisonment. The Assize Court when sentencing the applicant had taken into account the seriousness of the offences and had explained why a custodial sentence was appropriate and why it could not be suspended. Despite the fact that the penalty provided by the domestic law ranged from three years’ imprisonment to life imprisonment, as part of the arrangement reached with the Government the applicant had received a five year sentence, which he had served. The applicant had also repaid the amount taken as part of the deal. The PSC had then through disciplinary proceedings decided to impose the strictest punishment provided by the law, namely dismissal. In the applicant’s view the above had constituted an adequate response to his misconduct and had been commensurate to the damage to public confidence. However, as a result of the dismissal he had also been automatically deprived of all his retirement benefits, including his pension which had been earned during his thirty-three years of employment as a civil servant. This could have been avoided if the PSC had imposed compulsory retirement, which would not have affected his retirement rights. Consequently, even though the applicant had repaid his debt to society having been convicted by a criminal court, served a prison sentence, reimbursed the amount due, and lost his job, all his retirement benefits were forfeited, exposing him to great financial and emotional hardship. The applicant had been subjected to a triple punishment, which was contrary to the principles of international law and the spirit of the Convention, as no one should be punished more than once for the same offence. Furthermore, the punishment was of a continuing nature: the longer the applicant lived the harsher the punishment was, as he remained without a pension.
57. The applicant argued that just as in the case of Apostolakis (cited above) the imposition of the penalty of forfeiture of his retirement benefits was automatic and therefore sui generis disproportionate. In the above case the Court had also ruled that the fact that domestic law provided for the pension to be transferred to the family was insufficient to compensate Mr Apostolakis for his loss.
58. The applicant pointed out that the Government had not provided full and detailed information about the public service pension scheme. Furthermore, their observations were misleading, for a number of reasons. First of all, during the criminal proceedings the Government had not insisted on the maximum penalty provided by the domestic law, but had agreed to reach an arrangement in the case. How could they now argue before the Court that the imposition of a lesser disciplinary penalty would have been wrong? Secondly, the Government had attempted to create the impression that there was a clear distinction under domestic law between what was designated as the public service retirement pension and the social security pension, but that was not the case, as these pensions were treated as one. This was the reason why when a person reached retirement he was entitled only to one pension, and the pension granted under the Pensions Law was reduced by the corresponding amount granted as a pension from the Social Insurance Fund. The Government had failed to mention this. When the applicant had turned sixty-three and started receiving a social security pension, the pension received by his wife pursuant to section 79(7) of the Public Service Law was reduced by the complementary amount received by him from the Social Insurance Fund. Thirdly, it was misleading to argue that the payment of the non-contributory pension constituted a reward for faithful service. The pension could not be construed as a reward by the Government to the employee, but as part of his/her entitlements. It was therefore not subject to a work performance review. He lastly submitted, relying on the dissenting opinion of Judge Ress in the Grand Chamber judgment in Azinas (cited above), that it would be arbitrary to place the dividing line under the property aspect between those public servants who were working within a system of social security contracts where contributions were formally paid and those whose contributions were from the very beginning indirectly deducted from their salaries and therefore paid by the State.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. General principles
59. The principles which apply generally in cases under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 are equally relevant when it comes to pensions (see Stummer v. Austria [GC], no. 37452/02, § 82, 7 July 2011, and Andrejeva v. Latvia [GC], no. 55707/00, § 77, 18 February 2009). Thus, that provision does not guarantee the right to acquire property (ibid.). Nor does it guarantee, as such, any right to a pension of a particular amount (see, among many other authorities, Andrejeva, cited above, and Valkov and Others v. Bulgaria, nos. 2033/04, 19125/04, 19475/04, 19490/04, 19495/04, 19497/04, 24729/04, 171/05 and 2041/05, § 84, 25 October 2011). However, where a Contracting State has in force legislation providing for the payment as of right of a pension – whether or not conditional on the prior payment of contributions – that legislation has to be regarded as generating a proprietary interest falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for individuals who satisfy its requirements (see, among other authorities, Pej?i? v. Serbia, no. 34799/07, § 55, 8 October 2013; Stummer, cited above, § 82; Carson and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 42184/05, §§ 64-65, ECHR 2010; and Banfield, and Apostolakis, § 29, both cited above). The reduction or the discontinuance of a pension may therefore constitute an interference with peaceful enjoyment of possessions that needs to be justified (see, among other authorities, Grudi? v. Serbia, no. 31925/08, § 72, 17 April 2012, and Valkov and Others, cited above).
60. The first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful and that it should pursue a legitimate aim “in the public interest” (see, among many authorities, The Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, §§ 79 and 83). Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to decide what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures interfering with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions (see, among other authorities, Stefanetti and Others v. Italy, nos. 21838/10, 21849/10, 21852/10, 21822/10, 21860/10, 21863/10, 21869/10, and 21870/10, § 52, 15 April 2014). Here, as in other fields to which the safeguards of the Convention extend, the national authorities accordingly enjoy a certain margin of appreciation (see, among other authorities, The Former King of Greece and Others, cited above, § 87).
61. Any interference must also be reasonably proportionate to the aim pursued. In other words, a “fair balance” must be struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights. The requisite balance will not be found if the person or persons concerned have had to bear an individual and excessive burden (see, among many other authorities, The Former King of Greece and Others, cited above, §§ 89-90).
2. Application to the present case
(a) Admissibility
62. The Court notes that it was common ground between the parties that the retirement benefits of a civil servant in Cyprus constituted a possession under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Indeed, in the light of its case-law (see paragraph 58 above), the Court finds that the applicant, when entering the civil service, acquired a right which amounted to a “possession” and that therefore this provision is applicable in the present case.
63. The Court further notes this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
(b) Merits
64. The parties agreed that the forfeiture of the applicant’s retirement benefits amounted to an interference with his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. Furthermore, it was not in dispute that the interference, which was based on the unambiguous wording of section 79(7) of the Public Service Law, was lawful in terms of both domestic and Convention law. The Court, taking into account its relevant case-law, sees no reason to hold otherwise.
65. The Court notes in this respect that the reduction or forfeiture of a retirement pension acts neither as a control of use nor a deprivation of property, but that it falls to be considered under the first sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 (see Klein, § 49, and Banfield, both cited above).
66. Accordingly, it is the issue of proportionality which lies at the heart of the case. This being so, the Court must determine whether a fair balance was struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights.
67. The Court has no doubt that it was appropriate for the national authorities to bring disciplinary proceedings against the applicant in addition to the criminal ones and, given the applicant’s reprehensible misconduct and the nature and gravity of the offences, to opt for the most serious penalty, namely dismissal. Indeed, this is acknowledged by the applicant (see paragraph 56 above), whose grievance is concentrated rather on the automatic forfeiture of all his retirement rights upon his dismissal.
68. In this connection, the Court reiterates that in the case of Banfield (cited above) it held that, having regard to the margin of appreciation allowed to States in making appropriate provision for its civil servants’ pensions, it did not consider it inherently unreasonable for provision to be made for reduction or even total forfeiture of pensions in suitable cases. More recently, the Court has observed in general (see Da Silva Carvalho Rico v. Portugal ((dec.), no. 13341/14, 1 September 2015) and Stefanetti and Others, cited above, § 59, 15 April 2014), that the deprivation of the entirety of a pension was likely to breach Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, for example, Apostolakis, cited above, and Kjartan Ásmundsson v. Iceland, no. 60669/00, ECHR 2004 IX) and that, conversely, the imposition of a reduction which it considers to be reasonable and commensurate would not (see, for example, among many other authorities, Da Silva Carvalho Rico, and Valkov and Others, both cited above; Arras and Others v. Italy, no. 17972/07, 14 February 2012; Poulain v. France (dec.), no. 52273/08, 8 February 2011; and, a contrario, Stefanetti and Others, cited above). It is evident, however, from the relevant case-law, that whether or not the right balance has been struck will very much depend on the circumstances and particular factors of a given case which may tip the scales one way or the other.
69. In the present case, the applicant, after pleading guilty to a number of very serious offences which included obtaining a substantial amount of money by false pretences, forging cheques, concealment and abuse of office (see paragraph 8 above), was sentenced to five years’ imprisonment (criminal case no. 18115/02). In passing sentence the Nicosia Assize Court took into account another eight similar criminal cases pending against the applicant. A total of 223 criminal charges against the applicant were involved.
70. Following the applicant’s conviction in the above case and, after receiving the Attorney-General’s advisory opinion that the offences committed involved dishonesty or moral turpitude, the PSC initiated disciplinary proceedings against the applicant. The applicant was able to make representations before the PSC before the decision on the disciplinary penalty was taken. In particular, through his lawyer, the applicant put forward a number of mitigating factors and submitted a report by the Department of Social Welfare Services on his financial situation (see paragraph 13 above). Thereafter, the decision of the PSC was reviewed by the Supreme Court at two levels of jurisdiction. In addition, unlike in the case of Apostolakis (cited above), there were disciplinary proceedings which were separate from the criminal proceedings, and the applicant’s personal position was considered in depth before the PSC decided on the penalty to be imposed. The Court finds, and indeed the parties do not contest, that the applicant benefited from extensive procedural guarantees (see Banfield, cited above).
71. The Court observes that it was open to the PSC to impose any of the ten penalties provided for by section 79(1) of the Public Service Law. In the circumstances, it was inevitable that the penalty imposed on the applicant would be at the more severe end of the sliding scale of penalties, and after hearing the applicant’s counsel, the PSC chose the most severe penalty, namely dismissal. As a result, section 79(7) of the above Law applied, that is, the applicant forfeited his retirement benefits.
72. In practice, and again differently from the case of Apostolakis, that did not leave the applicant without any means of subsistence. In this respect the Court notes that the forfeiture concerned the applicant’s public service retirement benefits, that is, a retirement lump sum and a monthly pension (see paragraph 17 above). He remained eligible to receive, and did receive from August 2012, a social security pension from the Social Insurance Fund to which he and his employer had contributed (see paragraph 39 above).
73. Furthermore, a widow’s pension was paid to his wife pursuant to section 79(7) of the Public Service Law (a provision which was not applicable in the case of Azinas; see the Grand Chamber judgment, cited above, §§ 21-22), which ensured that his family immediately received a pension based on the assumption that he had died rather than been dismissed. It is true that the Court found, in the Apostolakis case, that the fact that a pension had been transferred to Mr Apostolakis’s family did not suffice to offset the loss of his own pension, as it considered that in future he could lose all means of subsistence and all social cover, for example, if he became a widower or divorced (see Apostolakis, cited above, § 40). The Court finds, however, that this reasoning cannot be applied in the present case as the applicant has not claimed that during the seven year period between his dismissal and the date when he became eligible and started to receive a social security pension, he was unable to benefit for any reason from the pension paid to his wife and family. Following that, he began to receive his social security pension in full; his public service retirement pension would in any event have been set off against the amount of the social security pension (see paragraph 58 above). In addition his wife continued and continues to receive a part of the widow’s pension (see paragraphs 39 and 58 above).
74. Weighing the seriousness of the offences committed by the applicant against the effect of the disciplinary measures (see, inter alia, paragraph 47 above) and taking all the above factors into consideration, the Court finds that the applicant was not made to bear an individual and excessive burden.
75. It follows that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 12 AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TAKEN IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION
76. The applicant complained that the deprivation of his retirement benefits, on the ground that his wife and dependents would still benefit from it, had been discriminatory on the basis of his marital status, and therefore contrary to Article 1 of Protocol No. 12 as well as Article 14 of the Convention taken together with Article 1 of Protocol No.1. Article 14 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 12 read as follows:
Article 14
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 12
“1. The enjoyment of any right set forth by law shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
77. The Government contested that argument.
78. The Court notes that the applicant’s complaint as to discrimination is triggered by the findings made by the Supreme Court, at first instance, and in particular, the weight that the court gave to the payment of a widow’s pension to his wife from the day of his dismissal pursuant to section 79(7) of the Public Service Law.
79. The Court notes that the clear aim of section 79(7) of the Public Service Law was to ensure that the effects of deprivation of a pension affected the person against whom disciplinary proceedings had been brought, and not his or her family. This provision benefited the applicant’s family and did not adversely affect him in any way.
80. Accordingly, the Court finds that this complaint is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 (a) and 4 of the Convention.
III. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
81. Lastly, the applicant complained that he had been unable to contest the legality of the decision of the PSC, that the decision had become unassailable, and that he had been deprived of effective access to court. He relied on Article 13 of the Convention. This provision reads as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
82. The Court notes that the applicant’s complaint under this provision is in effect a complaint about right of access to court under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. The Court observes, however, that the applicant was able to challenge the decision of the PSC before the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court examined the merits of the applicant’s arguments at first instance and on appeal, but he was unsuccessful, as it was ruled at both levels that the forfeiture of his retirement benefits resulting from his dismissal had been proportionate. In these circumstances it cannot be said that the applicant was deprived of his right of access to court. The mere fact that the outcome of the proceedings was not favourable to the applicant is not equivalent to depriving him of this right.
83. It follows that this complaint is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 (a) and 4 of the Convention.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the complaint concerning Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;

2. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 14 June 2016, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stephen Phillips Luis López Guerra
Registrar President

 

AVVISO IMPORTANTE
da leggere con attenzione prima di esaminare la sentenza

Le sentenze della Corte Europea sono liberamente disponibili sul sito ufficiale della Corte.

La Corte Europea, pero',   pronuncia le sue sentenze soltanto in lingua francese ed a volte in lingua inglese.


Per consentire agli espropriati che non conoscono queste lingue di avere un'idea di cio' che dice la Corte Europea, l'Associazione ha attivato un software di traduzione automatica delle sentenze; molte delle sentenze segnalate agli espropriati sono, quindi,  tradotte prevalentemente con programmi di traduzione automatica che, sebbene di qualita' molto elevata, servono soltanto a dare  un'idea di cio' che dice la Corte Europea a chi non conosce la lingua.
Chi fosse interessato ad un documento perfettamente tradotto, deve rivolgersi ad un traduttore specializzato in testi giuridici; se non ne dispone, puo' chiedere all'Associazione di segnalargliene uno; si badi pero' che i testi in italiano, anche se tradotti da un traduttore specializzato, non sono testi ufficiali.


Si ricorda che i testi ufficiali sono esclusivamente quelli in lingua francese o inglese e che gli Avvocati e i Tecnici che assistono gli espropriati devono utilizzarli esclusivamente nelle lingue ufficiali.
 

NOTE
I dati identificativi dei soggetti privati vengono omessi in ottemperanza alle disposizioni di legge (art 52 comma 1 d.lgs. 30 giugno 196, c.d. legge sulla privacy); questo repertorio e' un'appendice dell'opera I Diritti degli Espropriati - quali sono - come evolvono - norme italiane e norme europee - gli obblighi della P.A. - le posizioni dei Giudici, e pu?essere utilizzato senza alcun costo e senza limitazioni.



Conclusioni: Resto inammissibile
Nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà



TERZA SEZIONE PRECEDENTE







CAUSA PHILIPPOU C. CIPRO

(Richiesta n. 71148/10)









SENTENZA


STRASBOURG

14 giugno 2016


Richiesta per raccomandazione alla Grande Camera pendente



Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa di Philippou c. la Cipro,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (terza Sezione Precedente), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Luis López Guerra, Presidente
Helena Jäderblom,
Giorgio Nicolaou,
Johannes Silvis,
Branko Lubarda,
Pari Pastore Vilanova,
Alena Poláková, ?giudici
e Stefano Phillips, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato in 24 maggio 2016,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 71148/10) contro la Repubblica della Cipro depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino cipriota, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), 16 novembre 2010.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato con OMISSIS, avvocati che praticano in Nicosia. Il Governo cipriota (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato inizialmente col loro Rappresentante Sig. P. Clerides, Avvocato-generale della Repubblica della Cipro e successivamente col Sig. C. Clerides, il suo successore.
3. Il richiedente addusse che la confisca dei suoi diritti di pensione che seguono il suo proscioglimento dal servizio pubblico con la Servizio Commissione Pubblica (“il PSC”) era stato in violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, e che lui era stata una vittima della discriminazione sulla base del suo status maritale in violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 12 ed Articolo 14 della Convenzione lessero in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
4. 21 gennaio 2013 queste azioni di reclamo furono comunicate al Governo.
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque 30 agosto 1949 e vive in Nicosia.
Sfondo di A. alla causa
6. Il richiedente ebbe un lavoro al Settore di Terre ed Esami 1 dicembre 1971. 1 gennaio 1996 lui fu promosso alla posizione di ufficiale di assistente e 2 febbraio 1998 che lui è stato autorizzato col direttore del reparto a firmare ordini di pagamento come ufficiale di authorising. In 13 maggio 2002 un'azione di reclamo fu resa col direttore che segue un'irregolarità in una causa di acquisizione obbligatoria. Emerse dall'indagine che una serie di assegno bancario era stata emessa come risarcimento addotto a proprietari di terra che era stata acquisita obbligatoriamente, ma che gli assegno bancario non erano giunti mai ai beneficiari chiamati su loro.
7. Un numero di procedimenti penali fu portato contro il richiedente ed un complice. Sembra anche che un terza persona fu accusato ma quelli procedimenti furono terminati seguenti l'archiviazione di un nolle prosequi con l'Avvocato General. I procedimenti contro il richiedente comportarono un totale di 223 accuse criminali.
8. 18 gennaio 2005 il richiedente ricevette sentenze concomitanti che variano da due al reclusione di ' di cinque anni dalla Nicosia Assize Corte (n. 18115/02) su una dichiarazione di colpevole, seguendo un affare di dichiarazione a venti -
quattro accuse riguardo ad un numero di reati. Questi inclusero, inter l'alia, ottenendo che l'importo della 225,643.67 Cipro, controlla il peso (CYP) (approssimativamente 390,000 euros) con finzioni false, emettendo documenti falsi, contraffacendo assegno bancario, abuso di ufficio e nascondiglio. Parte dell'accordo giunta alle parti era che il richiedente avrebbe rimborsato la somma di CYP 150,000 (approssimativamente 255,000 euros), ed un ordine di sequestro per che somma fu emessa in riguardo della sua proprietà. Nell'imporre anche le frasi la Corte di Assize prese nell'esame un'altra otto cause pendente contro il richiedente di fronte a sé così come la Corte distrettuale di Nicosia.
9. Il richiedente depositò un ricorso con la Corte Suprema contro la sua frase (ricorso penale n. 22/05).
10. Seguendo la condanna del richiedente, ed avendo ricevuto l'opinione consultiva dell'Avvocato-generale che i reati commisero disonestà coinvolta o turpitudine morale, il PSC avviò procedimenti disciplinari contro il richiedente. Procedimenti simili furono avviati anche contro il suo complice, su chi il PSC impose pensionamento obbligatorio facendo seguito a sezione 79(1)(i) della Servizio Legge Pubblica di 1990 (Legge 1/1990; in seguito “la Servizio Legge Pubblica”; veda paragrafo 43 sotto).
11. Con una lettera 13 aprile 2005 datò il PSC informò il richiedente dell'opinione dell'Avvocato-generale e l'invitò a sembrarlo prima in 17 maggio 2005 e fare rappresentanze prima di procedere con l'imposizione di una sanzione penale disciplinare.
12. Il PSC convenne in 17 maggio 2005. L'avvocato del richiedente richiese un mese per preparare le sue note, siccome gli era stato nominato solamente recentemente ed in prospettiva della natura speciale della causa. Il PSC accordò la richiesta.
13. 13 giugno 2005, il richiedente che fu rappresentato con un avvocato fu ascoltato col PSC. Lui mise in avanti un numero di attenuare fattori che inclusero la sua situazione finanziaria ed atroce sospensione seguente dai suoi doveri il fatto che lui aveva pagato la maggior parte della somma concordata su con le autorità, la condanna e condanna lui aveva ricevuto dalla Corte di Assize, i suoi anni significativi di servizio e la punizione meno grave impose sul suo complice. Lui presentò anche un rapporto socio-economico col Settore di Benessere sociale Servizi.
14. 13 giugno 2005 il PSC decise di respingere il richiedente. Nella sua decisione il PSC osservò che questa causa era stata una delle cause più serie era stato affrontato con. La concezione e progettando dei crimini commesso mostrò una frode bene-esporre-in aumento che aveva dato un colpo al prestigio e la credibilità delle procedure del Settore di Terre ed Esami ed anche all'immagine del Servizio Pubblico in generale. Il PSC notò che i reati dei quali era stato dichiarato colpevole il richiedente inclusero alcuni dei reati più seri contro proprietà, così come l'abuso di ufficio e nascondiglio. La gravità dei reati era evidente dalla gravità delle frasi applicabile sotto la legge, la somma sostanziale il richiedente aveva garantito per azioni illegali sue, ed il fatto che otto più cause pendente contro lui concernendo reati simili era stato preso in considerazione con la Nicosia Assize Corte quando frase imponente. Il PSC indicò anche che il richiedente aveva affrontato 223 accuse in totale che era senza precedenti per la Cipro e quale rivelò la serietà e la magnitudine della causa.
15. Nel giungere alla sua decisione il PSC osservò che aveva preso in considerazione le circostanze e le condizioni che il richiedente aveva commesso i reati sotto. Lui era stato autorizzato per firmare ordini di pagamento ed era stato affidato con la Repubblica con l'importante posto di promuovere cause che concernono acquisizione obbligatoria e cittadini che notificano coinvolto in queste cause. Il richiedente non visse su comunque, alle sue responsabilità, sfruttò la sua posizione, e sviluppò le sue attività penali con sfrontatezza senza precedenti e l'avventatezza. Lui era stato il grande intelletto, istigatore ed esecutore principale delle attività penali.
16. Il PSC notò anche che aveva preso nell'esame che che era stato detto col consiglio del richiedente nella mitigazione, in particolare, il richiedente personale e circostanze di famiglia, così come il fatto che lui si era impegnato compensare per la parte di and/or di danno del danno subì con la Repubblica come una conseguenza dei suoi atti penali. Inoltre, il PSC indicò che lui era stata la protagonista principale e questo era stato sottolineato con la Corte di Assize quando distinguendo la frase passata su lui da quel passò su suo co-accusato.
17. Facendo seguito a sezione 79(7) della Servizio Legge Pubblica (veda paragrafo 43 sotto), la sanzione penale disciplinare di proscioglimento data luogo alla confisca del pensionamento di servizio pubblico del richiedente intero trae profitto (in seguito “pensionamento trae profitto”). Questo comportò la perdita di un prezzo globale di pensionamento ed una pensione mensile.
18. Infine, il PSC decise che la parte del salario del richiedente che era stato trattenuto durante il periodo della sua sospensione da servizio non sarebbe stata ritornata a lui.
19. Su alla data del suo proscioglimento il richiedente lavorava da trenta-tre anni nel servizio pubblico.
20. 23 marzo 2006 il richiedente ritirò il suo ricorso.
21. Facendo seguito a sezione 79(7) della Servizio Legge Pubblica (veda paragrafo 43 sotto), sua moglie ricevette la pensione di una vedova. Questo corrispose a 15,600 euros (EUR) per anno.
Procedimenti di controllo giurisdizionale di B.
1. I procedimenti di primo-istanza
22. 26 agosto 2005 il richiedente portò un ricorso di fronte alla Corte Suprema (giurisdizione di revisional) sotto Articolo 146 della Costituzione, cercando l'annullamento della decisione del PSC di respingerlo dal Servizio Pubblico e della confisca conseguente dei suoi diritti di pensione (il ricorso n. 994/2005).
23. Il richiedente affermò che la confisca dei suoi benefici di pensionamento era stata in violazione di Articolo 23 della Costituzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. In questo riguardo il richiedente dibattè che i suoi diritti di pensione costituirono un “la proprietà”, e che la loro confisca automatica conseguente al suo proscioglimento era sproporzionato.
24. 2 aprile 2007 la Corte Suprema, in un ex decisione di tempore, sostenne che il ricorso era ammissibile. La corte osservò che la causa concernè la discrezione del PSC nel decidere sul proscioglimento, mentre prese in considerazione tutti i parametri attinenti e, in particolare, il proscioglimento di conseguenze avrebbe per il richiedente. Perciò, la decisione sulla sanzione penale e le conseguenze erano molto collegò da vicino, mentre portando al prima linea il principio della proporzionalità come l'aspetto principale della discrezione del PSC. Era ovvio dalla decisione del PSC che nell'esercitare la sua discrezione quando scegliendo la sanzione penale per essere impostolo aveva preso in considerazione l'arma automatica, come sé considerò, con legge, perdita di benefici di pensionamento. Di conseguenza la corte concluse che la gravità estrema della causa giustificò, nonostante le sue ripercussioni gravi sui diritti di pensionamento del richiedente, la sanzione penale di proscioglimento. Se nella fine la corte fosse accettare le rivendicazioni del richiedente, gli accantonare della sanzione penale di proscioglimento non potevano essere esclusi. La Corte Suprema concluse perciò che potesse continuare ad esaminare i meriti del ricorso.
25. In 7 maggio 2007 la Corte Suprema respinse il ricorso, ma non assegnò costa contro il richiedente in prospettiva della natura dei problemi legali sollevata.
26. La Corte Suprema, dopo avere deciso che il pensionamento trae profitto di un servitore pubblico in Cipro costituì una proprietà sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, seguì ad esaminare se o c'era stata non una violazione dei diritti del richiedente sotto questa disposizione. Guida che disegna dalla causa-legge della Corte, ed in particolare le sentenze nella causa di Azinas c. la Cipro (n. 56679/00, 20 giugno 2002 e [GC], n. 56679/00, ECHR 2004 III), e la decisione nella causa di Banfield c. il Regno Unito ((il dec.), n. 6223/04, ECHR 2005 XI), la Corte Suprema aguzzò a quelli fattori che giustificarono la privazione del diritto a proprietà in questa causa prima. Un fattore così principale nella prospettiva della corte era la gravità dei reati commessa. Considerò in questo riguardo che i characterisation della causa del PSC come uno del più serio nella sua storia non sembrarono essere un'esagerazione. L'impressione data coi reati era simile che non solo loro comportarono un bene-organised frode ma loro anche, più importantemente, siccome asserì il PSC, diede un colpo al prestigio e la fedeltà dell'amministrazione. La corte considerò che condannando il richiedente al reclusione di ' di cinque anni, così come respingendolo, non esaurisca necessariamente i limiti della discrezione dello Stato per mettere diritto di cose. Inoltre, come in Azinas, la non-privazione di benefici di pensione nella causa di un piano di pensione alla quale l'impiegato non fece contributi corrisponderebbe a ricompensando il richiedente.
27. Allo stesso tempo, le conseguenze serie della punizione del richiedente - una frase del reclusione di ' di cinque anni e proscioglimento - doveva essere considerato anche, particolarmente le difficoltà finanziarie che sorgono dalla privazione dei diritti detti come un supplementare “la punizione” per il richiedente e la sua famiglia. La corte osservò che questo era un importante fattore per essere preso in considerazione, secondo le circostanze di ogni causa. Se la privazione non fosse stata automatica ma discrezionale all'interno della struttura di procedure decretate, come in Inghilterra, sarebbe stato possibile esaminare se ci dovrebbe essere una privazione ed a che misura. La corte notò in questo riguardo che sarebbe stato davvero buono per lo Stato per considerare la prospettiva di un emendamento alla legge seriamente così come fare il sistema più flessibile e più equo in ogni causa. C'era anche inoltre, il fatto che il richiedente aveva restituito in larga misura i soldi lui aveva malversato, un fatto che, benché aveva detto il PSC che l'aveva preso in considerazione, non sembri avere colpito la sua decisione, poiché la punizione impose sul richiedente era, delle dieci forme previste per, l'estremo uno di proscioglimento invece di scegliere il secondo più forma seria di punizione che di pensionamento obbligatorio che non avrebbe comportato la perdita di diritti di pensionamento.
28. Nella fine, comunque la Corte Suprema considerò che il fatto che la causa in oggetto sorse e fu ascoltato sulla base di un regime legale e diverso da che in Azinas come riguardi le conseguenze di proscioglimento che comporta la perdita di diritti di pensione, inclinò le scale, benché leggermente, in favore della Repubblica. La condizione in sezione 79(7) che la pensione del richiedente dal giorno del suo proscioglimento sarebbe pagata a sua moglie e figli dipendenti come se lui fosse morto su che data ridusse per la famiglia la fatica che è il risultato del proscioglimento. Nonostante questo, la corte osservò, che era probabile che ci sarebbero state cause con conseguenze anche più atroci per l'impiegato respinto, come quando non c'erano nessuna moglie o figli dipendenti, o la loro relazione era simile che l'impiegato respinto non potesse aspettarsi ragionevolmente di trarre profitto per loro. Comunque, nulla era stato detto di includere la causa presente fra quelle cause, a parte la possibilità teoretica che sua moglie potrebbe morire prima il richiedente. La corte affermò che, se le questioni fossero altrimenti, era probabile che avrebbe deciso differentemente.
29. Infine, la Corte Suprema sottolineò che i corpi competenti dovrebbero studiare la possibilità di correggere la struttura legale sulla base del diritto vigente in Inghilterra seriamente, così che la privazione di diritti di pensionamento non era automatica ma potrebbe essere guardata a con l'aiuto di procedure decretate e con l'esercizio della discrezione in ordine che è probabile che il PSC determini, con vuole dire di una decisione ragionata, la misura alla quale era equo a penale se a tutti in qualsiasi la particolare causa, secondo le circostanze speciali dell'individuo e le necessità. La Corte Suprema considerò che sia l'articolo di legge e la concezione moderna della giustizia individuale esigè questo.
2. Procedimenti di ricorso
30. 5 giugno 2007 il richiedente depositò un ricorso con la Corte Suprema (giurisdizione di revisional di appello; il ricorso n. 78/2007). Lui impugnò la primo-istanza che trova riguardo a sezione 79(7 prima) della Servizio Legge Pubblica. Lui presentò che questa sezione era contraria ad Articolo 23 della Costituzione di Cipro ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, come la confisca dei suoi benefici di pensionamento era stato automatico, senza l'esercizio di qualsiasi il potere discrezionale. In questo riguardo lui dibattè che la corte di primo-istanza aveva fatto domanda erroneamente il principio di proporzionalità durante l'esame della sanzione penale imposto col PSC, e perciò era stato sbagliato quando decise che la misura era proporzionata ed in linea con la Convenzione. In secondo luogo, il richiedente chiese che la sentenza della corte di primo-istanza che le conseguenze di questa decisione sono state ridotte perché lui si sposò e così sua moglie e figli dipendenti riceverebbero una pensione, era discriminatorio sulla base di status maritale e così in violazione di Articolo 28 della Costituzione.
31. 12 giugno 2007 il Governo rispondente piacque anche (il ricorso n. 81/2007) impugnando le sentenze di primo-istanza (un) che nella causa presente i benefici di pensionamento potrebbero essere considerati un “la proprietà”; (b) che nel proscioglimento disciplinare di un servitore pubblico non era nessuna struttura decretata che prevede per l'esercizio della discrezione come a se i benefici di pensionamento sarebbero accordati; e (il c) che il pagamento della pensione alla moglie del richiedente era il fattore essenziale e solo che inclinò le scale in favore della Repubblica.
32. In 18 maggio 2010 la Corte Suprema respinse sia ricorsi senza assegnare costi, in prospettiva dell'importanza della questione sollevata. Concordò con la corte di primo-istanza sta trovando che il diritto ad una pensione e le sue condizioni costituirono una proprietà dell'impiegato. Questo diritto fu creato con l'appuntamento dell'impiegato. Il fatto che una pensione fu data alla moglie e figli dipendenti suggerirono che benefici di pensione furono considerati come “la proprietà” quale potrebbe essere trasferito. In questo riguardo la corte si riferì alla sua sentenza nella causa di Pavlou c. la Repubblica (revisional piace n. 161/2006, (2009) 3 CLR 1402; veda paragrafo 46 sotto) e la sentenza della Corte nella causa di Apostolakis c. la Grecia (n. 39574/07, 22 ottobre 2009).
33. La corte seguì a trovare, comunque che la privazione dei benefici di pensionamento del richiedente era stata giustificata. In questo riguardo, la corte notò, che il PSC aveva scelto la sanzione penale di proscioglimento sotto sezione 79(7) della Servizio Legge Pubblica, dopo avere esercitato la sua discrezione e dopo in considerazione delle conseguenze ed il fatto che tale sanzione penale era nell'interesse pubblico. La corte di primo-istanza aveva esaminato se l'imposizione della sanzione penale di proscioglimento che provocò la confisca automatica di benefici di pensionamento era sproporzionata. Aveva esaminato se il PSC, quando esercitando la sua discrezione, aveva fatto domanda il principio della proporzionalità nel decidere sulla sanzione penale di proscioglimento che diede luogo alla privazione automatica di diritti di pensionamento. In questo riguardo contenne che il PSC aveva esercitato la sua discrezione quando decidendo di imporre la sanzione penale di proscioglimento. Il PSC aveva avuto una varietà di sanzioni penali disponibili alla sua disposizione, come pensionamento obbligatorio che non provocò la confisca della pensione. Comunque, decise in prospettiva dei reati commessa col richiedente che simile privazione è stata giustificata.
34. La Corte Suprema indicò che la Corte europea di Diritti umani aveva ammesso che l'amministrazione aveva la discrezione ampia nel decidere su simile questioni.
35. Seguì a concordare con la corte di primo-istanza che la privazione dei benefici di pensionamento del richiedente era stata giustificata in prospettiva della serietà dei reati che avevano dato un colpo alla fedeltà e la credibilità dell'amministrazione. La disposizione di diritto nazionale attinente fu tirata servitori pubblici e scoraggianti dal commettere reati seri ed a proteggendo la gestione liscia dell'amministrazione. Sezione 79(7) della Servizio Legge Pubblica non era contrario ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, fin dalla privazione di benefici di pensionamento una punizione non era da sola, ma una conseguenza dell'imposizione della sanzione penale di proscioglimento.
36. La corte seguì a distinguere la causa del richiedente da che di Apostolakis nel quale la confisca era stata seguendo automatica una condanna penale ed aveva comportato la privazione di sia pensione e diritti di previdenza sociale e perciò di tutti i mezzi di esistenza. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, benché il richiedente fosse stato privato dei suoi benefici di pensionamento come un servitore pubblico, lui era stato concesso per ricevere benefici dall'Assicurazione Fondo Sociale che fu calcolato sulla base di contributi rese col datore di lavoro e l'impiegato. Riferendosi alla sentenza della Corte nella causa di Wieczorek c. la Polonia (n. 18176/05, 8 dicembre 2009), fondò che il richiedente non era stato privato di tutti i mezzi di esistenza.
37. Come alla questione della discriminazione a causa di status maritale, sollevò col richiedente, la Corte Suprema sostenne che i commenti della corte di primo-istanza sulla questione non sostennero la rivendicazione del richiedente della discriminazione. I commenti in oggetto era stato reso su una base ipotetica e non fece domanda alla causa presente.
38. Infine, la Corte Suprema trattò coi motivi rimanenti di ricorso fissati in avanti col Governo. Osservò che la decisione di primo-istanza era all'effetto che nell'evento di proscioglimento la legge non previde per una procedura riguardo all'esercizio della discrezione per confiscare diritti di pensionamento, ma non disse che non era possibile esercitare la discrezione sulla questione, poiché riconobbe che c'era una scelta fra proscioglimento che comporta confisca di diritti e pensionamento obbligatorio che non facevano. Infine, indicò che la corte di primo-istanza aveva esposto fuori nella sua decisione tutti i fatti che aveva preso in considerazione nel decidere sulla proporzionalità della confisca, ed aveva concluso esattamente che il pagamento della pensione alla moglie voluta dire che la privazione non era sproporzionata. La corte non assegnò costa in prospettiva degli importanti problemi sollevata.
C. le Altre informazioni attinenti
39. Il richiedente sta ricevendo una pensione di previdenza sociale dall'Assicurazione Fondo Sociale fin da 31 agosto 2012, quando lui giunse all'età di sessanta-tre. La pensione perciò ricevuta con sua moglie facendo seguito a sezione 79(7) della Servizio Legge Pubblica fu ridotto poi con la somma complementare ricevuta con lui dall'Assicurazione Fondo Sociale. Secondo una lettera 28 novembre 2012 spedito a lei con la Tesoreria di Stato datò, la sua pensione fu ridotta con EUR 854,94 per mese.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
Pensionamento di A. trae profitto e punizioni disciplinari
40. Il diritto di un servitore pubblico a benefici di pensionamento è governato con la Pensioni Legge, Legge 97(1)/97, corretto. Le sezioni attinenti, come applicabile al tempo, preveda siccome segue:
Sezione 4 (Accordando di benefici di pensionamento)
“(1) qualsiasi pensione, prezzo globale o gratifica, e gli altri assegni sono accordate per affermare ufficiali della Repubblica di Cipro in conformità con le disposizioni dell'Atto presente.
(2) qualsiasi pensione, prezzo globale o gratifica accordate sotto questo Atto saranno calcolate in conformità con le disposizioni in vigore sulla data effettiva del pensionamento dell'ufficiale statale.”
Sezione 5 (accusando il Fondo Consolidato)
“Il Fondo Consolidato della Repubblica sarà accusato con ogni pensione, prezzo globale, gratifica o l'altro allowance/benefit per le quali la Repubblica è responsabile sulla base della legge”
Sezione 7 (esenzione da imposta sul reddito)
“Qualsiasi gratifica e prezzo globale accordati sulla base delle disposizioni di legge sono esentati dall'imposizione di imposta sul reddito.”
41. Inoltre, sezione 8 della Pensioni Legge offre la formula di calcolo per pensioni e pagamenti di prezzo globale. Il seguente è le cause specificate in sezione 9, come applicabile al tempo al quale diede un titolo ad un impiegato statale inter alia, una pensione e pagamento di prezzo globale. Questi erano: (un) su giungere all'età di pensionamento obbligatorio o a qualsiasi calcola da allora in poi; (b) su giungere all'età di cinquanta-cinque; (il c) sull'abolizione di posto di his/her; (d) su pensionamento di his/her, facilitare il miglioramento di organisational del servizio al quale appartiene he/she che può realizzare così operazione più effettiva del servizio o risparmi; (e) in causa l'impiegato non era capace di compiere i doveri di his/her con ragione di un'incapacità mentale o fisica che era probabile essere permanente; (f) nell'evento di conclusione dei servizi dell'impiegato sui motivi specializzati di interesse pubblico nella conformità con la legge applicabile ed attinente; (il grammo) nell'evento del suo pensionamento su conto dell'inadeguatezza o l'inabilità; (h) nell'evento dell'imposizione con l'organo disciplinare e competente della sanzione penale disciplinare di pensionamento obbligatorio; (i) su pensionamento per ragioni di interesse pubblico di prendere dell'altro ufficio pubblico che è incompatibile con ufficio di his/her o posto; (j) su pensionamento per ragioni di interesse pubblico essere nominato ad un'organizzazione di beneficio pubblica o autorità locale; e (il k) nell'evento di primo pensionamento volontario.
42. Sezione 45 della Pensioni Legge prevede per riduzione di una pensione prevista sotto le disposizioni di legge con l'importo complementare ed equivalente che è stato pagando ad un pensionato o in questo riguardo con virtù delle Social Security Leggi con riguardo ad a pagamenti di assicurazione sui quali contributi furono resi dopo 6 ottobre 1980. Per i fini di sezioni 5(1) e 88(1) delle Social Security Leggi l'impiegato è riguardato, con riferimento a qualsiasi il servizio altro che il servizio che è preso nell'esame nel calcolare l'importo di massimo di pensione e l'importo di gratifica, come non coperto con un schema di pensione professionale.
43. Inoltre, le sezioni attinenti della Servizio Legge Pubblica (Legge 1/1990), come applicabile al tempo, benefici di pensionamento governante e punizione disciplinare lessero, siccome segue:
Sezione 56 (pensionamento trae profitto)
(1) il pensionamento trae profitto di ufficiali permanenti e pensionabili è quelli prescritti con la Pensioni Legge o qualsiasi legge che corregge o sostituì per lo stesso e qualsiasi Regolamentazioni fabbricò thereunder.
(2) il pensionamento trae profitto di un ufficiale mensile-pagato che non appartiene al servizio pubblico e permanente e non sta notificando su contratto, sarà prescritto con Regolamentazioni resa sotto questa Legge.”
Sezione 79 (punizioni disciplinari)
“1. Nella conformità con la Legge presente, le sanzioni penali disciplinari e seguenti possono essere imposte,:
(un) il rabbuffo
(b) rabbuffo grave
(il c) trasferimento disciplinare
(d) interruzione di aumento salariale annuale
(e) sospensione di aumento salariale annuale
(f) multa che non può eccedere il salario di ' di tre mesi
(il grammo) riduzione in scale di salario
(h) riduzione in fila
(i) pensionamento obbligatorio
(j) il proscioglimento.
...
7. Proscioglimento comporta la perdita di tutti i benefici di pensionamento.
Si offre che una pensione è pagata alla moglie o figli dipendenti, se qualsiasi, di un servitore pubblico che fu respinto come se lui era morto sulla data del suo proscioglimento e sé sarà calcolato sulla base dei suoi anni effettivi di servizio.”
44. È notato che sezione 79(1) e (7) della più prima legge, vale a dire la Servizio Legge Pubblica di 1967 (Legge 33/1967), applicabile al tempo del lavoro del richiedente, era lo stesso come quel contenne in Legge 1/1990, salvi per lo scorso paragrafo di sezione 79(7) che prevede per pagamento di una pensione alla famiglia del servitore pubblico respinto. Questo emendamento fu introdotto con Legge 1/1990.
B. disposizioni Costituzionali ed Attinenti e causa-legge
45. Le disposizioni Costituzionali ed attinenti lessero siccome segue:
Articolo 23
“1. Ogni persona, da solo o congiuntamente con altri ha diritto ad acquisire, possieda, possieda, goda o disponga di qualsiasi mobile o patrimonio immobiliare e ha diritto a rispettare per così corretto. Il diritto della Repubblica ad acqua di sottosuolo, minerale e le antichità sono riservate.
2. Nessuna privazione o restrizione o limitazione di qualsiasi così corretto sarà reso eccetto come previsto in questo Articolo.
3. Restrizioni o limitazioni che sono assolutamente necessarie nell'interesse della sicurezza pubblica, salute o morale, o la città e pianificazione di contea o lo sviluppo ed utilisation di qualsiasi proprietà alla promozione del beneficio pubblico o per la protezione dei diritti di altri può essere imposto con legge sull'esercizio di così corretto....”
Articolo 166 (1)
“Là sarà accusato sul Fondo Consolidato oltre a qualsiasi concessione, rimunerazione o gli altri denari accusarono con qualsiasi l'altra disposizione di questa Costituzione o legge -
(un) tutte le pensioni e gratifiche per le quali la Repubblica è responsabile;....”
Articolo 169 (3)
“Trattati, convenzioni ed accordi conclusi in conformità con le disposizioni precedenti di questo Articolo avranno, come dalla loro pubblicazione nell'ufficiale Pubblichi della Repubblica, vigore superiore a qualsiasi il diritto statale a condizione che simile trattati, convenzioni ed accordi sono fatti domanda con l'altra parte inoltre.”
46. La Corte Suprema, nella causa di Pavlou c. la Repubblica (Revisional piace n. 161/2006, (2009) 3 CLR 1402) che interessato la riduzione della pensione Statale su ricevuta di una pensione di vecchio-età dall'Assicurazione Fondo Sociale, sostenne che una pensione costituì proprietà ed era di conseguenza un diritto individuale che ha richiesto tutela giuridica.
III. MATERIALE INTERNAZIONALE ED ATTINENTE
47. Il preambolo del Consiglio della Diritto penale Convenzione dell'Europa sulla Corruzione del 1999 letture di 27 gennaio, in finora come attinente, siccome segue:
“Il preambolo
Il membro Stati del Consiglio di Europa e gli altri Stati firmatario finora,
...
Emphasising che la corruzione minaccia l'articolo di legge, la democrazia e diritti umani, mina il buon governo, l'equità e la giustizia sociale, distorce la competizione, impedisce sviluppo economico e mette in pericolo la stabilità di istituzioni democratiche ed i fondamenta morali di società;
...”
LA LEGGE
IO. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1 A La Convenzione
48. Il richiedente si lamentò che la confisca del suo pensionamento trae profitto seguente il suo proscioglimento dal servizio pubblico violò Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Le parti le osservazioni di '
1. Il Governo
49. Il Governo presentò che la questione che determina nella causa, nella luce della causa-legge della Corte che concerne azioni di reclamo simili sulla confisca o perdita di pensione era se un equilibrio equo era stato previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed il requisito della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo. Loro notarono che, in linea con la causa-legge della Corte, la confisca di una pensione di pensionamento incorse essere considerata sotto la prima frase del primo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, poiché né si comportò come un controllo di uso né come una privazione di proprietà. Nella prospettiva del Governo l'equilibrio equo e richiesto non era stato ecceduto.
50. Il Governo, appellandosi sulla decisione della Corte nella causa di Banfield (citò sopra) indicò che il diritto dello Stato per portare procedimenti disciplinari contro il richiedente oltre a procedimenti penali non era in oggetto: i procedimenti penali riferirono alle violazioni di diritto penale ed i procedimenti disciplinari alla violazione del richiedente della relazione di fiducia che deve esistere fra tutti gli impiegati ed il loro datore di lavoro. Loro osservarono in questo riguardo che la situazione nella causa presente era stata la stessa come in Banfield: il richiedente aveva tratto profitto da protezione procedurale, e la sanzione penale impose su lui era stato un discrezionale.
51. Prima di tutti, la procedura disciplinare aveva cominciato seguente la conclusione dei procedimenti penali. Il PSC aveva trasmesso la sentenza della Corte di Assize all'Avvocato-generale per un'opinione come a se i reati dei quali il richiedente era stato dichiarato colpevole disonestà comportata e turpitudine morale. Dopo avere ricevuto l'opinione dell'Avvocato-generale, il PSC aveva riconosciuto il richiedente il diritto per essere ascoltato prima di decidere sulla sanzione penale disciplinare.
52. In secondo luogo, la decisione del PSC di respingere il richiedente era stata discrezionale. Questo era stato evidente da sia la Corte Suprema ex decisione di tempore di 2 aprile 2007 e la sua sentenza su ricorso (veda divide in paragrafi 24 e 33 sopra). La causa presente era perciò distinguibile da che di Apostolakis (citò sopra) in che la condanna stessa aveva condotto alla confisca automatica della pensione. Inoltre, diversamente da nella causa di Azinas (citò sopra), il PSC aveva preso in considerazione un numero di problemi quando decidendo sulla sanzione penale, come i fattori che attenuano citati con l'avvocato del richiedente. Questi avevano incluso la sua situazione finanziaria e difficile - un rapporto socio-economico del Settore di Benessere sociale Servizi era stato presentato col richiedente - ed il fatto che il suo co-accusato aveva ricevuto la sanzione penale agile di pensionamento obbligatorio. Nell'esercitare la sua discrezione, il PSC aveva preso conto del fatto che il richiedente era stato il protagonista principale ed i cervelloni dietro ai reati commessi. Presto dopo che lui era stato affidato col compito di firmare auorizzazione per il pagamento del risarcimento a membri del pubblico per le acquisizioni obbligatore della loro proprietà, lui aveva sistematicamente, su un periodo di due anni, usato la sua posizione per defraudare finanziamenti pubblici di importi sostanziali per il suo proprio guadagno personale. Lui aveva progettato lo schema intero, e l'aveva giustiziato con l'aiuto di suo co-accusato. Di conseguenza 223 accuse criminali erano state portate contro lui, ed i reati dei quali gli era stato dichiarato colpevole ed era stato condannato erano stati molto seri. Il Governo considerò che potrebbe essere presunto che il richiedente aveva provocato danno considerevole alla fiducia del pubblico nel corretto funzionando del Servizio Pubblico e l'onestà di impiegati Statali nell'amministrare finanziamenti Statali. Il PSC aveva deciso perciò di imporre la sanzione penale di proscioglimento che era il più grave purché con la Servizio Legge Pubblica, la perdita di tutti i benefici di pensionamento specificata in sezione 56 di portò come sé che Legge, come applicabile al tempo. Il Governo sottolineò in questo riguardo che nella causa di Banfield (citò sopra) la Corte aveva affermato che non era inerentemente irragionevole per disposizione per essere costituito pari la confisca totale di una pensione in cause appropriate.
53. La pensione di pensionamento del richiedente e prezzo globale erano stati procurati completamente in terzo luogo, pubblicamente, il richiedente che non ha fatto contributi. La confisca riferita allo Stato sta procurando dello schema di pensione. Nessun problema sorse perciò della confisca di contributi resa col richiedente. Appellandosi sulla causa di Klein c. l'Austria (n. 57028/00, § 57 3 marzo 2011), il Governo presentò che questo era un importante fattore per prendere in considerazione. Il pagamento della Repubblica di una pensione di pensionamento di servizio pubblica senza qualsiasi contributo coi suoi servitori civili costituì la ricompensa dell'impiegato per servizio fedele. Se il richiedente avesse ricevuto questa ricompensa, o parte di sé, la fiducia pubblica sarebbe stata scossa inoltre. Il Governo indicò in questo riguardo che al tempo del suo proscioglimento il richiedente era stato coperto con un schema di pensione professionale applicabile a tutti gli impiegati in Stato. Questo schema fornì ad impiegati Statali benefici sul loro pensionamento o dimissione da servizio. Nell'evento della loro morte i benefici furono dati al loro dependents. Il richiedente, su pensionamento sarebbe stato concesso ad una pensione annuale ed un pagamento di prezzo globale calcolabile in conformità con le disposizioni della Pensioni Legge, come applicabile al tempo. Che legge previde che la Repubblica fu obbligata per pagare quelli benefici che furono accusati al conto del finanziamento consolidato della Repubblica. Questo era il finanziamento in che, con virtù della Costituzione, tutti gli uffici imposte e monies sollevarono, o ricevettero con la Repubblica fu pagato. Se il richiedente fosse andato in pensione volontariamente 13 giugno 2005, facendo seguito a sezione 8 della Pensioni Legge (veda paragrafo 41 sopra), lui sarebbe stato concesso ad una pensione annuale che corrisponde ad EUR 17,161.65; il prezzo globale venne ad EUR 80,087.82.
54. Comunque, in contrasto alla causa di Apostolakis (citò sopra), la perdita del richiedente di benefici di pensionamento non aveva comportato perdita dei suoi diritti di assicurazione sociali, né lui era stato privato di tutti i mezzi di esistenza. A tutti i tempi di materiale il richiedente, come tutti gli impiegati in Stato era stato assicurato anche obbligatoriamente sotto il Piano assicurativo Sociale generale della Repubblica che coprì tutti gli impiegati e li diede un titolo ad al pagamento di una pensione di previdenza sociale dall'Assicurazione Fondo Sociale. Questa pensione fu procurata con contributi di impiegato così come contributi padronali, ed il suo livello dipese dagli importi che erano stati contribuiti. Il diritto a benefici pagabile dall'Assicurazione Fondo Sociale non fu colpito nell'evento di proscioglimento. Di conseguenza, fin da 2012, quando il richiedente giunse all'età di sessanta-tre, lui stava ricevendo una pensione di previdenza sociale dall'Assicurazione Fondo Sociale che corrisponde ad EUR 1,363.98 per mese. Benché il Governo ammise che questo importo era leggermente meno che che che lui sarebbe stato concesso a sotto la Pensioni Legge se lui fosse andato in pensione volontariamente 13 giugno 2005, diversamente da richiedente nella causa di Apostolakis all'età di cinquanta-sei il richiedente ancora aveva lavoro potenziale.
2. Il richiedente
55. Il richiedente presentò, in primo luogo, che era chiaro dalle sentenze nazionali ed era anche base comune fra le parti che la sua pensione ha corrisposto ad una proprietà all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 e che la sua privazione costituì un'interferenza col suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Era la posizione del richiedente che questa interferenza era ingiustificata. In questo riguardo lui dibattè che una pensione costituì una parte integrante del contratto di lavoro che il Governo ha proposto a tutti i suoi impiegati, vale a dire servitori civili. Questo era evidente dagli schemi di servizio previsti col Governo. Lavoro nel servizio civile venne con un'impresa generale ed un'aspettativa legittima e corrispondente che una pensione era pagabile come una parte integrante delle condizioni di servizio. Era parte del pacco di lavoro complessivo che il Governo intraprese finanziare e pagare alla fine del lavoro di uno. Di conseguenza, quando il lavoro del richiedente fu terminato col Governo lui fu concesso alla sua pensione.
56. Il richiedente presentò che la confisca automatica del suo pensionamento trae profitto sull'imposizione della sanzione penale di proscioglimento non era stata nell'interesse pubblico e non poteva essere considerata allineato o proporzionato. Il richiedente aveva pleaded colpevole a ventiquattro accuse nei procedimenti penali ed era stato condannato al reclusione di ' di cinque anni. L'Assize Court quando condannando il richiedente aveva preso in considerazione la serietà dei reati ed aveva spiegato perché una frase di custodial era appropriata e perché non poteva essere sospeso. Nonostante il fatto che la sanzione penale previde col diritto nazionale variato dal reclusione di ' di tre anni ad ergastolo, come parte della disposizione giunta al Governo il richiedente aveva ricevuto una condanna di anno del cinque che lui aveva scontato. Il richiedente aveva rimborsato anche l'importo preso come parte della quantità. Il PSC aveva poi per procedimenti disciplinari deciso di imporre la punizione più severa prevista con la legge, vale a dire il proscioglimento. Nella prospettiva del richiedente i sopra avevano costituito una risposta adeguata alla sua cattiva condotta ed erano stati commisurati al danno alla fiducia pubblica. Comunque, come un risultato del proscioglimento che lui era stato privato anche automaticamente di tutto il suo pensionamento trae profitto, incluso la sua pensione che era stata guadagnata durante i suoi trenta-tre anni di lavoro come un servitore civile. Questo si avrebbe potuto evitare se il PSC avesse imposto pensionamento obbligatorio che non avrebbe colpito i suoi diritti di pensionamento. Di conseguenza, anche se il richiedente aveva rimborsato il suo debito a società stato stato dichiarato colpevole con un tribunale penale, notificò una pena detentiva, rimborsò l'importo dovuto, e perduto il suo lavoro, tutti i suoi benefici di pensionamento furono confiscati, mentre mettendolo in mostra alla grande fatica finanziaria ed emotiva. Il richiedente era stato sottoposto ad una punizione tripla che era contraria ai principi di diritto internazionale e lo spirito della Convenzione come nessuno dovrebbe essere punito più che una volta per lo stesso reato. Inoltre, la punizione era di una natura che continua: il più lungo il richiedente visse il più aspro la punizione era, siccome lui rimase senza una pensione.
57. Il richiedente dibattè che nel momento in cui nella causa di Apostolakis (citò sopra) l'imposizione della sanzione penale della confisca del suo pensionamento trae profitto era automatico e perciò sui generis sproporzionato. Nella causa sopra la Corte aveva deciso anche che il fatto che diritto nazionale previde per la pensione per essere trasferito alla famiglia era insufficiente per compensare il Sig. Apostolakis per la sua perdita.
58. Il richiedente indicò che il Governo non aveva offerto le piene e particolareggiate informazioni dello schema di pensione di servizio pubblico. Inoltre, le loro osservazioni stavano fuorviando, per un numero di ragioni. Durante i procedimenti penali il Governo non aveva insistito prima di tutti, sulla sanzione penale di massimo prevista col diritto nazionale, ma era stato d'accordo a giungere ad una disposizione nella causa. Come potrebbero dibattere ora di fronte alla Corte che l'imposizione di una minore sanzione penale disciplinare sarebbe stata sbagliata? In secondo luogo, il Governo aveva tentato di creare l'impressione che c'era una distinzione chiara sotto diritto nazionale fra che che fu designato come la pensione di pensionamento di servizio pubblica e la previdenza sociale assegna una pensione a, ma quel non era la causa, siccome queste pensioni furono trattate come uno. Questa era la ragione perché quando una persona giunse a pensionamento lui fu concesso solamente ad una pensione, e la pensione accordò sotto la Pensioni Legge fu ridotto con l'importo corrispondente accordato come una pensione dall'Assicurazione Fondo Sociale. Il Governo era andato a vuoto a menzionare questo. Quando il richiedente aveva girato sessanta-tre ed aveva cominciato a ricevere una pensione di previdenza sociale, la pensione ricevuta con sua moglie facendo seguito a sezione 79(7) della Servizio Legge Pubblica fu ridotto con l'importo ricevuto complementare con lui dall'Assicurazione Fondo Sociale. In terzo luogo, stava fuorviando dibattere che il pagamento della pensione non contribuente costituì una ricompensa per servizio fedele. La pensione non poteva essere costruita come una ricompensa col Governo all'impiegato, ma come parte di diritti di his/her. Non era perciò soggetto ad una revisione di adempimento di lavoro. Lui presentò infine, mentre appellandosi sull'opinione che dissente di Giudice Ress nella Grande sentenza di Camera in Azinas (citò sopra), che sarebbe arbitrario per mettere la linea che divide sotto l'aspetto di proprietà fra quelli servitori pubblici che stavano lavorando all'interno di un sistema di contratti di previdenza sociale dove contributi furono pagati formalmente e quegli i cui contributi erano dal molto inizio dedussero indirettamente dai loro salari e perciò pagarono con lo Stato.
B. la valutazione di La Corte
1. Principi Generali
59. I principi che fanno domanda in cause sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo generalmente N.ro 1 è ugualmente attinente quando viene a pensioni (veda Stummer c. l'Austria [GC], n. 37452/02, § 82, 7 luglio 2011, ed Andrejeva c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 55707/00, § 77 18 febbraio 2009). Così, che disposizione non garantisce il diritto per acquisire proprietà (l'ibid.). Né garantisce, come così qualsiasi diritto ad una pensione di un particolare importo (veda, fra molte altre autorità, Andrejeva, citato sopra, e Valkov ed Altri c. la Bulgaria, N. 2033/04, 19125/04, 19475/04 19490/04, 19495/04 19497/04, 24729/04 171/05 e 2041/05, § 84 25 ottobre 2011). Comunque, dove un Stato Contraente ha in legislazione di vigore che prevede di pieno diritto per il pagamento di una pensione-se o non condizionale sul pagamento precedente di contributi-che legislazione doveva essere considerata generando un interesse di proprietà riservato che incorre all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 per individui che soddisfano i suoi requisiti (veda, fra le altre autorità, Peji ?c. Serbia, n. 34799/07, § 55 8 ottobre 2013; Stummer, citato sopra, § 82; Carson ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 42184/05, §§ 64-65 ECHR 2010; e Banfield, ed Apostolakis, § 29 sia citò sopra). La riduzione o la cessazione di una pensione può costituire perciò un'interferenza con godimento tranquillo di proprietà che hanno bisogno di essere giustificate (veda, fra le altre autorità, Grudi c. Serbia, n. 31925/08, § 72, 17 aprile 2012, e Valkov ed Altri, citato sopra).
60. Il primo e la maggior parte di importante requisito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà dovrebbe essere legale e che dovrebbe intraprendere un scopo legittimo “nell'interesse pubblico” (veda, fra molte autorità, Il Re Precedente di Grecia ed Altri c. la Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, §§ 79 e 83). A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per decidere che che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito con la Convenzione, è così per le autorità nazionali per fare la valutazione iniziale come all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure che interferiscono col godimento tranquillo di proprietà (veda, fra le altre autorità, Stefanetti ed Altri c. l'Italia, N. 21838/10, 21849/10, 21852/10, 21822/10, 21860/10, 21863/10, 21869/10, e 21870/10, § 52, 15 aprile 2014). Qui, come negli altri campi ai quali prolungano le salvaguardie della Convenzione, le autorità nazionali godono di conseguenza un certo margine della valutazione (veda, fra le altre autorità, Il Re Precedente di Grecia ed Altri, citato sopra, § 87).
61. Qualsiasi interferenza deve essere anche ragionevolmente proporzionata allo scopo perseguì. Nelle altre parole, un “equilibrio equo” deve essere previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo. L'equilibrio richiesto non si troverà se la persona o persone riguardate hanno dovuto sopportare un carico individuale ed eccessivo (veda, fra molte altre autorità, Il Re Precedente di Grecia ed Altri, citato sopra, §§ 89-90).
2. La richiesta alla causa presente
(un) l'Ammissibilità
62. La Corte nota che era base comune fra le parti che il pensionamento trae profitto di un servitore civile in Cipro costituì una proprietà sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Effettivamente, nella luce della sua causa-legge (veda paragrafo 58 sopra), i costatazione di Corte che il richiedente, quando digitando il servizio civile, acquisì un diritto al quale corrispose un “la proprietà” e che perciò questa disposizione è applicabile nella causa presente.
63. La Corte nota inoltre questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
(b) i Meriti
64. Le parti concordarono che la confisca dei benefici di pensionamento del richiedente corrispose ad un'interferenza col suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Inoltre, non era in controversia che l'interferenza che fu basata sull'enunciazione non ambigua di sezione 79(7) della Servizio Legge Pubblica, era legale in termini di sia nazionale e legge di Convenzione. La Corte, mentre prendendo in considerazione la sua causa-legge attinente, non vede nessuna ragione di sostenere altrimenti.
65. La Corte nota in questo riguardo che la riduzione o la confisca di una pensione di pensionamento né si comporta come un controllo di uso né una privazione di proprietà, ma che incorre essere considerato sotto la prima frase del primo paragrafo di Articolo 1 (veda Klein, § 49, e Banfield, sia citò sopra).
66. Di conseguenza, è il problema di proporzionalità che giace al cuore della causa. Questo essere così, la Corte deve determinare se un equilibrio equo fu previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo.
67. La Corte senza dubbio ha che era appropriato per le autorità nazionali per portare procedimenti disciplinari contro il richiedente oltre ai penali e, dato la cattiva condotta biasimevole del richiedente e la natura e la gravità dei reati, optare per la sanzione penale più seria, vale a dire il proscioglimento. Effettivamente, questo è ammesso col richiedente (veda paragrafo 56 sopra) il cui danno è concentrato piuttosto sulla confisca automatica di tutti i suoi diritti di pensionamento sul suo proscioglimento.
68. In questo collegamento, la Corte reitera, che nella causa di Banfield (citò sopra) contenne che, avendo riguardo ad al margine della valutazione concesso a Stati nel costituire disposizione appropriata i suoi servitori civili ' assegna una pensione a, non lo considerò inerentemente irragionevole per disposizione per essere costituito riduzione o anche la confisca totale di pensioni in cause appropriate. Più recentemente, la Corte ha osservato in generale (veda Da Silva Carvalho Rico c. il Portogallo ((il dec.), n. 13341/14, 1 settembre 2015) e Stefanetti ed Altri, citato sopra, § 59, 15 aprile 2014), che era probabile che la privazione dell'interezza di una pensione violasse Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda, per esempio, Apostolakis, citato sopra, e Kjartan Ásmundsson c. l'Islanda, n. 60669/00, ECHR 2004 IX) e che, al contrario., l'imposizione di una riduzione che considera essere ragionevole e commisurato non può (veda, per esempio, fra molte altre autorità Da Silva Carvalho il Rico, e Valkov ed Altri, sia citò sopra; Arras ed Altri c. l'Italia, n. 17972/07, 14 febbraio 2012; Poulain c. la Francia (il dec.), n. 52273/08, 8 febbraio 2011; e, un contrario, Stefanetti ed Altri, citato sopra). Comunque, è evidente dalla causa-legge attinente che se o non l'equilibrio corretto è stato previsto dipenderà moltissimo dalle circostanze ed i particolari fattori di una causa determinata che può fornire di punta le scale un modo o l'altro.
69. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, il richiedente, dopo avere supplicato colpevole ad un numero di reati molto seri che inclusero ottenendo un importo sostanziale di soldi con finzioni false mentre contraffacendo assegno bancario, nascondiglio e l'abuso di ufficio (veda paragrafo 8 sopra), fu condannato al reclusione di ' di cinque anni (causa penale n. 18115/02). In frase passeggera la Nicosia Assize Corte prese in considerazione un'altra otto cause penali simili pendente contro il richiedente. Un totale di 223 accuse criminali contro il richiedente fu comportato.
70. Seguendo la condanna del richiedente nella causa sopra e, dopo avere ricevuto l'opinione consultiva dell'Avvocato-generale che i reati commisero disonestà coinvolta o turpitudine morale, il PSC iniziò procedimenti disciplinari contro il richiedente. Il richiedente era in grado fare rappresentanze di fronte al PSC di fronte alla decisione sulla sanzione penale disciplinare fu preso. In particolare, per il suo avvocato, il richiedente mise in avanti un numero di attenuare fattori e presentò un rapporto col Settore di Benessere sociale Servizi sulla sua situazione finanziaria (veda paragrafo 13 sopra). Da allora in poi, la decisione del PSC fu fatta una rassegna con la Corte Suprema a due livelli di giurisdizione. In oltre, diversamente da nella causa di Apostolakis (citò sopra), c'erano procedimenti disciplinari che erano separato dai procedimenti penali, e la posizione personale del richiedente fu considerata in profondità di fronte al PSC decise sulla sanzione penale per essere imposto. La Corte trova, e davvero le parti non contestano, che il richiedente trasse profitto da garanzie procedurali ed estese (veda Banfield, citato sopra).
71. La Corte osserva che era aperto al PSC per imporre qualsiasi delle dieci sanzioni penali previde per con sezione 79(1) della Servizio Legge Pubblica. Nelle circostanze, era inevitabile che la sanzione penale impose sul richiedente sarebbe alla fine più grave della scala scorrevole di sanzioni penali, e dopo ascolti il consiglio del richiedente, il PSC scelse la sanzione penale più grave, vale a dire il proscioglimento. Di conseguenza, sezione 79(7) della Legge sopra fatta domanda, quel è, il richiedente confiscò i suoi benefici di pensionamento.
72. In pratica, e di nuovo differentemente dalla causa di Apostolakis che non ha lasciato il richiedente senza qualsiasi vuole dire di esistenza. In questo riguardo la Corte nota che la confisca concernè i benefici di pensionamento di servizio pubblici del richiedente che sono un prezzo globale di pensionamento ed una pensione mensile (veda paragrafo 17 sopra). Lui rimase eleggibile ricevere, e ricevette da agosto 2012, una pensione di previdenza sociale dall'Assicurazione Fondo Sociale alla quale lui ed il suo datore di lavoro avevano contribuito (veda paragrafo 39 sopra).
73. Inoltre, la pensione di una vedova fu pagata a sua moglie facendo seguito a sezione 79(7) della Servizio Legge Pubblica (una disposizione che non era applicabile nella causa di Azinas; veda la Grande sentenza di Camera, citato sopra, §§ 21-22) che assicurò che immediatamente la sua famiglia ricevette una pensione basata sull'assunzione piuttosto che la quale lui era morto stato respinto. È vero che la Corte fondò, nella causa di Apostolakis che il fatto che una pensione era stata trasferita alla famiglia del Sig. Apostolakis non basti compensare la perdita di sua propria pensione, come sé considerò che in futuro lui potesse perdere tutti i mezzi di esistenza ed ogni coperta sociale, per esempio se lui divenne un vedovo o accordò il divorzio a (veda Apostolakis, citato sopra, § 40). Comunque, la Corte trova che questo ragionamento non può essere fatto domanda nella causa presente come il richiedente non ha chiesto che durante il periodo di anno del sette fra il suo proscioglimento e la data quando lui divenne eleggibile ed avviò ricevere una pensione di previdenza sociale, lui era incapace a beneficio per qualsiasi ragione dalla pensione pagò a sua moglie e famiglia. Seguendo che, lui cominciò a ricevere la sua pensione di previdenza sociale in pieno; la sua pensione di pensionamento di servizio pubblica può in qualsiasi evento è stato esposto via contro l'importo della pensione di previdenza sociale (veda paragrafo 58 sopra). In oltre sua moglie continuò e continua a ricevere una parte della pensione della vedova (veda divide in paragrafi 39 e 58 sopra).
74. Pesando la serietà dei reati commessa col richiedente contro l'effetto delle sanzioni disciplinari (veda, inter l'alia, divida in paragrafi 47 sopra) e prendendo tutti i fattori sopra nell'esame, i costatazione di Corte che il richiedente non è stato reso per sopportare un carico individuale ed eccessivo.
75. Segue che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. Violazioni allegato Di Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 12 Ed Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1 Preso In Concomitanza Con Articolo 14 Di La Convenzione
76. Il richiedente si lamentò che la privazione del suo pensionamento trae profitto, sulla base che sua moglie e dependents ancora trarrebbero profitto da sé, erano stati discriminatorio sulla base del suo status maritale, e perciò contrariano ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 12 così come Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso insieme con Articolo 1 di Protocollo No.1. Articolo 14 ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 12 lettura siccome segue:
Articolo 14
“Il godimento dei diritti e le libertà insorse avanti [il] Convenzione sarà garantita senza la discriminazione su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o l'altro status.”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 12
“1. Il godimento di qualsiasi set destro sarà garantito avanti con legge senza la discriminazione su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o l'altro status.”
77. Il Governo contestò quel l'argomento.
78. La Corte nota che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente come alla discriminazione è provocato con le sentenze rese con la Corte Suprema, per prima citi un esempio, ed in particolare, il peso che la corte ha dato al pagamento della pensione di una vedova a sua moglie dal giorno del suo proscioglimento facendo seguito a sezione 79(7) della Servizio Legge Pubblica.
79. La Corte nota che lo scopo chiaro di sezione 79(7) della Servizio Legge Pubblica assicurare era che gli effetti della privazione di una pensione colpirono la persona contro chi procedimenti disciplinari erano stati portati, e non suo o la sua famiglia. Questa disposizione trasse profitto la famiglia del richiedente e non lo colpì avversamente in qualsiasi il modo.
80. Di conseguenza, i costatazione di Corte che questa azione di reclamo è mal-fondata manifestamente e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 (un) e 4 della Convenzione.
III. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ALLEGATO DI LA CONVENZIONE
81. Infine, il richiedente si lamentò che lui non era stato capace di contestare la legalità della decisione del PSC, che la decisione era divenuta inattaccabile, e che lui era stato privato di accesso effettivo per corteggiare. Lui si appellò su Articolo 13 della Convenzione. Questa disposizione legge siccome segue:
“Ognuno cui diritti e le libertà come insorga avanti [il] Convenzione è violata avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale nonostante che la violazione è stata commessa con persone che agiscono in una veste ufficiale.”
82. La Corte nota che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto questa disposizione quasi esatto è in effetto un'azione di reclamo di accesso corteggiare sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Comunque, la Corte osserva che il richiedente era in grado impugnare la decisione del PSC di fronte alla Corte Suprema. La Corte Suprema per prima esaminò i meriti degli argomenti del richiedente citano un esempio e su ricorso, ma lui era senza successo, come sé fu deciso a sia i livelli che la confisca del suo pensionamento trae profitto essendo il risultato del suo proscioglimento era stato proporzionato. In queste circostanze non può essere detto che il richiedente fu privato del suo diritto di accesso per corteggiare. Il fatto mero che la conseguenza dei procedimenti non era favorevole al richiedente non è equivalente a spogliandolo di questo diritto.
83. Segue che questa azione di reclamo è mal-fondata manifestamente e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 (un) e 4 della Convenzione.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, UNANIMAMENTE
1. Dichiara l'azione di reclamo riguardo ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;

2. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 14 giugno 2016, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Stefano Phillips Luis López Guerra
Cancelliere Presidente



 
Copyright 2007 - Risoluzione 1024x768