A.N.P.T.ES.  Associazione Nazionale Per la Tutela degli Espropriati  Sito 3

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui: Vai alla ricerca personalizzata >
Se vuoi tornare alla HOME del repertorio clicca qui:  Torna alla HOME >
Per tornare indietro: Usa il tasto indietro del tuo navigatore
CASO: CASE OF BRITISH GURKHA WELFARE SOCIETY AND OTHERS v. THE UNITED KINGDOM
TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza NUMERO: 44818/11/2016 DATA: 15/09/2016
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media) STATO: Inghilterra ORGANO: Sezione Prima
ARTICOLI: 14,34,35,P1-1
 
TESTO ORIGINALE TESTO TRADOTTO

AVVISO IMPORTANTE
da leggere con attenzione prima di esaminare la sentenza

Le sentenze della Corte Europea sono liberamente disponibili sul sito ufficiale della Corte.

La Corte Europea, pero',   pronuncia le sue sentenze soltanto in lingua francese ed a volte in lingua inglese.


Per consentire agli espropriati che non conoscono queste lingue di avere un'idea di cio' che dice la Corte Europea, l'Associazione ha attivato un software di traduzione automatica delle sentenze; molte delle sentenze segnalate agli espropriati sono, quindi,  tradotte prevalentemente con programmi di traduzione automatica che, sebbene di qualita' molto elevata, servono soltanto a dare  un'idea di cio' che dice la Corte Europea a chi non conosce la lingua.
Chi fosse interessato ad un documento perfettamente tradotto, deve rivolgersi ad un traduttore specializzato in testi giuridici; se non ne dispone, puo' chiedere all'Associazione di segnalargliene uno; si badi pero' che i testi in italiano, anche se tradotti da un traduttore specializzato, non sono testi ufficiali.


Si ricorda che i testi ufficiali sono esclusivamente quelli in lingua francese o inglese e che gli Avvocati e i Tecnici che assistono gli espropriati devono utilizzarli esclusivamente nelle lingue ufficiali.
 

NOTE
I dati identificativi dei soggetti privati vengono omessi in ottemperanza alle disposizioni di legge (art 52 comma 1 d.lgs. 30 giugno 196, c.d. legge sulla privacy); questo repertorio e' un'appendice dell'opera I Diritti degli Espropriati - quali sono - come evolvono - norme italiane e norme europee - gli obblighi della P.A. - le posizioni dei Giudici, e puo' essere utilizzato senza alcun costo e senza limitazioni.



Conclusions: Remainder inadmissible (Article 35-1 - Exhaustion of domestic remedies) No violation of Article 14+P1-1-1 - Prohibition of discrimination (Article 14 - Discrimination) (Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions)



FIRST SECTION






CASE OF BRITISH GURKHA WELFARE SOCIETY AND OTHERS v. THE UNITED KINGDOM

(Application no. 44818/11)










JUDGMENT




STRASBOURG

15 September 2016


This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of British Gurkha Welfare Society and Others v. the United Kingdom,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, President,
Ledi Bianku,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Paul Mahoney,
Aleš Pejchal,
Robert Spano,
Pauliine Koskelo, judges,
and Abel Campos, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 23 August 2016,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 44818/11) against the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) on 10 June 2011 by the British Gurkha Welfare Society, a non-governmental unincorporated association which acts on behalf of 399 Gurkha veterans, OMISSIS, a joint Nepalese and British national born in 1953, and OMISSIS, a Nepalese national born in 1960 (“the applicants”).
2. The applicants were represented by Mr E. Cooper of Slater and Gordon (UK) LLP (formerly Russell Jones & Walker Solicitors), a lawyer practising in London. The United Kingdom Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms A. McLeod of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.
3. On 16 January 2013 the application was communicated to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
4. The facts of the case, as submitted by the parties, may be summarised as follows.
A. The historical background
5. Nepalese Gurkha soldiers have served the Crown since 1815, initially as soldiers in the (British) Indian Army. Following Indian independence in 1947, six Gurkha regiments were transferred to the Indian Army, while four regiments became an integral part of the British Army. More than 200,000 Gurkha soldiers fought in the two world wars, and in the past fifty years they have served in Hong Kong, Malaysia, Borneo, Cyprus, the Falklands, Kosovo, Iraq and Afghanistan. They have served in a variety of roles, mainly in the infantry but also as engineers and in signals and logistics units.
6. Today, they form the Brigade of Gurkhas (“the Brigade”), in which only Nepali nationals are eligible for service. The Brigade is not an operational brigade in the conventional sense; rather, it is an administrative entity which ensures that Gurkha units, into which all Gurkha soldiers are recruited and serve, are able to be integrated into – and form part of – other operational brigades in the British Army.
7. The Brigade was originally based in the Far East, in the region formerly known as Malaya. In 1971 the Brigade’s base moved to Hong Kong. On completion of the handover of Hong Kong to China in July 1997, the home base moved to the United Kingdom. Consequently, the majority of Gurkhas are currently stationed in the United Kingdom, although since 1962 a section of the Brigade has been stationed in Brunei.
B. The Gurkhas Terms and Conditions of Service (or “TACOS”)
1. Salary
8. Pursuant to a memorandum of understanding of 9 November 1947 (“the Tripartite Agreement”), the Governments of the United Kingdom, India and Nepal agreed that the salary of Gurkhas serving in the British Army would be set by reference to rates applied by India in respect of Indian soldiers so as to avoid competition between the Indian and British armies for Gurkha recruits. The Brigade’s basic pay was therefore set in accordance with the Indian Pay Code, although cost-of-living allowances were paid for service outside Nepal. These allowances used to be calculated by reference to local living expenses (for example, in Hong Kong or Brunei), but in 1997, when the Brigade’s home base moved to the United Kingdom, a “universal addition” was introduced to ensure that, whenever a Gurkha soldier was serving outside Nepal, his take-home pay would be similar to that of a non-Gurkha soldier in the British Army of comparable rank and experience. However, the “universal addition” was not treated as pensionable pay.
2. Accompanied service
9. Prior to 1 April 2006, Married Accompanied Service entitlement (that is, an entitlement for the soldier to be accompanied by wife and children) was for one married accompanied tour of between two and three years in the first fifteen years of service and for permanent accompanied service for Gurkhas ranked Colour Sergeant and above. However, with effect from 1 April 2006, those who had served for three years or more in the Brigade were entitled to Married Accompanied Service (in other words, they were entitled to be joined in the United Kingdom by their wives and children).
3. Retirement age
10. Gurkha soldiers are required to retire after fifteen years’ service, subject to the possibility, dependent on rank, of one or more yearly extensions.
11. In comparison, other soldiers in the British Army are entitled to serve for twenty-two years.
4. Eligibility for settlement in the United Kingdom
12. Historically, Gurkha soldiers were discharged to Nepal and it was presumed that they would remain there during retirement.
(a) The 2004 amendments to the Immigration Rules
13. On 25 October 2004 the Immigration Rules (HC 394) were changed to permit Gurkha soldiers with at least four years’ service who retired on or after 1 July 1997 (the date that the Gurkha’s home base relocated to the United Kingdom) to apply for settlement in the United Kingdom. Approximately 90 per cent of the 2,230 eligible Gurkha soldiers have since applied successfully to settle in the United Kingdom with their qualifying dependants.
(b) The 2009 amendments to the Immigration Rules
14. On 21 May 2009 the Secretary of State for the Home Department announced a new policy under which all former Gurkhas who had served in the British Army for at least four years would be eligible for settlement in the United Kingdom. Approximately thirty-five per cent of those eligible have since applied for resettlement in the United Kingdom.
5. Pension entitlement
15. The Tripartite Agreement provided that the pensions of Gurkhas serving in the British Army would also be set by reference to the rates applied by India to Indian soldiers.
(a) The Gurkha Pension Scheme
16. In 1949 the Gurkha Pension Scheme (“GPS”) was established by Royal Warrant and applied the former Indian Army Pensions Code to Gurkhas serving in the Brigade. Pension entitlements under the GPS were index-linked to the cost of living in Nepal as it was presumed that the Gurkhas would retire there. Pensions were immediately payable upon retirement and could not be deferred. A Gurkha who retired without having served fifteen years would be entitled to no pension whatsoever.
17. In 1981 Gurkha pensions were reviewed and the rate payable was set at the highest rate applicable under the Indian Army pension arrangements.
18. In 1999, following a ministerial review, the rates applicable to the pensions of Gurkhas in the Brigade were increased by over 100 per cent, taking them over the scales set by the Indian Army. The rationale for the increase was that a Gurkha who retired from the Brigade to Nepal would not receive the benefit of various schemes which soldiers retiring from the Indian Army could access, such as the provision of certain medical facilities. The increase applied to all Gurkhas regardless of the date of discharge.
(b) The Armed Forces Pension Scheme
19. Non-Gurkha soldiers retiring from the British Army are entitled to pensions under either the Armed Forces Pensions Scheme 1975 (“AFPS 75”) or the Armed Forces Pensions Scheme 2005 (“AFPS 05”) depending on when they commenced service. Neither scheme is index linked with the cost of living in the soldier’s country of origin.
20. Under the AFPS, soldiers are eligible for deferred pensions, payable at the age of 60, provided that they have rendered at least two years’ service before leaving the British Army. In order to receive an immediate pension officers are required to serve for sixteen years and all other ranks are required to serve for twenty-two years; however, in practice fewer than one fifth of non-Gurkha soldiers in the British Army serve for sufficiently long periods to be eligible for an immediate pension.
21. The annual pension entitlement under the GPS is broadly equivalent – taking into account the adjustments made in 1981 and 1999 – to one-third of that under the AFPS.
(c) Review of Gurkhas Terms and Conditions of Service
22. Following the 2004 amendment to the Immigration Rules (see paragraph 13 above), the Secretary of State for Defence announced a review of the Gurkhas’ Terms and Conditions of Service. The review noted that the 2004 amendment to the Immigration Rules and the changes to Married Accompanied Service (see paragraph 9 above) had changed the traditional assumption that British Gurkhas would retire in Nepal, and pointed to a future in which they could be expected increasingly to regard the United Kingdom, rather than Nepal, as their family base. The Review Team therefore concluded that, the affordability issues notwithstanding, the major differences in Gurkha terms and conditions of service could no longer be justified on legal or moral grounds and recommended that they be modernised by bringing them largely into line with those available to the wider Army.
23. With regard to pensions, the review concluded that on balance the GPS was more suitable than the AFPS to support the life-cycle of the great majority of Gurkhas up until July 1997. However, moving the Brigade’s base to the United Kingdom and the subsequent change to the Immigration Rules had altered the previously valid assumption that Gurkhas would retire in Nepal. For a Gurkha retiring to a second career in the United Kingdom, the GPS profile was
“clearly wrong, paying sums too small to be useful at a time when he does not need them and an inadequate pension at retirement age. As the life profile of the typical Gurkha approaches that of his UK/Commonwealth counterpart, there can be little to be said in favour of providing them with such different pension benefit profiles.”
24. The report recommended that serving and retired members of the Brigade should be allowed to transfer from the GPS to either AFPS 75 or 05, depending on when they enlisted. Those who were already in the GPS and wished to remain in it could do so, but it would be closed with effect from April 2006.
(d) The Gurkha Offer to Transfer
25. In March 2007 the United Kingdom formulated the Gurkha Offer to Transfer (“GOTT”) and this was given effect in the Armed Forces (Gurkha Pension) Order 2007 (“the 2007 Order”). Gurkhas who retired before 1 July 1997 did not qualify for the GOTT. However, the GOTT enabled Gurkha soldiers who retired on or after 1 July 1997 to transfer from the GPS to either AFPS 75 or AFPS 05 depending on when they first enlisted in the British Army. The terms of any transfer were such that the accrued rights to a pension for service after 1 July 1997 would transfer into the AFPS scheme on a year-for-year basis.
26. In respect of service rendered before 1 July 1997 the Explanatory Memorandum to the 2007 Order explained that
“although Gurkha service from 1 July 1997 is transferable on a one-for-one basis, Article 2 L4 provides that pre-1997 Gurkha service counts proportionately depending upon the rank of the transferee. This proportion is not arbitrary: it has been arrived at after careful calculation by the Government Actuary’s Department. It represents broadly the value of the pre-1997 benefits accrued in the GPS. A Gurkha transferring to either AFPS will be given fair pension value for his GPS service.”
27. Under the actuarial calculation adopted by the Government, a year’s service before 1 July 1997 translated – in terms of pension entitlement – to the equivalent of between 23 and 36 per cent of the value of a year’s service of a non-Gurkha soldier of equivalent rank.
28. The transition from the GPS to the AFPS for those opting to transfer who were already in receipt of a pension under the GPS did not deprive them of their existing GPS pension, which would continue to be paid. Transfer to the relevant AFPS occurred at 60 or 65, when they received the preserved pension. However, as they had been in receipt of the GPS pension from around the age of thirty-three, the capital value of the pension pot at retirement age would be reduced by the payments received under the GPS up to that date.
29. Nearly all serving Gurkhas elected to transfer to the AFPS (only 0.3 per cent elected to remain in the GPS). Of those who had retired, but remained eligible for transfer, approximately three per cent elected to remain in the GPS.
C. The applicants
30. The first applicant is a non-governmental unincorporated association that acts on behalf of 399 former members of the Brigade.
31. The second applicant is a former Gurkha soldier who retired from the Brigade on 8 February 1997 after having accumulated fifteen years’ service. As he completed his service prior to 1 July 1997, he is ineligible to transfer any of his pensionable years to one of the AFPSs. His pension continues to be governed by the GPS and, as such, is valued at approximately fifty per cent of that which a British soldier of equivalent rank would receive for the same period and type of service.
32. The third applicant is a former Gurkha soldier who retired from the Brigade on 31 July 2002 after having accumulated almost thirty-one years’ service. The last five years of service were transferred into the AFPS on a year-for-year basis. The preceding twenty-six years of service were transferred under an actuarial calculation pursuant to the 2007 Order. Under that calculation the pensionable value of each of his years of service was regarded as equivalent to approximately twenty-seven per cent of a pensionable year served by a British soldier of equivalent rank engaged in the same type of service.
D. Domestic proceedings
33. On 7 March 2008 the applicants issued an application for judicial review in the High Court challenging the legality of both (a) the decision that Gurkhas who retired prior to 1 July 1997 were not entitled to transfer their pension rights under the GPS into the AFPS and (b) the decision that, for those Gurkhas who retired after 1 July 1997, service before that date did not rank on a year-for-year basis. The challenge was advanced on three grounds: under the Race Relations Act 1976 (namely, that there had been a breach of a procedural duty to promote equality of opportunity); on grounds of irrationality; and under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 read together with Article 14. In relation to the third ground, the applicants alleged that they were discriminated against in their entitlement to an army pension on the basis of their age and/or nationality. In particular, they argued that they were treated differently both from younger Gurkha soldiers who had (more) years of service after 1 July 1997 and from regular British Army soldiers.
34. The applicants were granted permission to pursue their judicial review application. A hearing took place in October 2009. At the hearing the parties agreed that the 2009 change to the Immigration Rules (see paragraph 14 above) was irrelevant for the purpose of the proceedings.
35. On 11 January 2010 the High Court dismissed the application on all three grounds. In respect of the age discrimination challenge the High Court relied on its earlier decision in R (Gurung) v. Ministry of Defence [2008] EWHC 1496 (Admin) (summarised at paragraphs 45 – 49 below), in which it held that the difference in treatment did not occur due to the difference in age but due to the dates at which service had been rendered. The judge in the present applicants’ case noted that
“when lines are drawn for any purpose by reference to dates the result may well include some indirect age discrimination.”
36. In reaching this conclusion, the court rejected the argument – advanced by the applicants – that age discrimination should be treated as a “suspect” ground.
37. In respect of the discrimination-on-grounds-of-nationality challenge the High Court considered that it was bound by R (Purja and Others) v. Ministry of Defence [2003] EWCA Civ 1345 (summarised at paragraphs 41 – 44 below), in which the Court of Appeal had ruled that Gurkhas with service before 1 July 1997 were in a markedly different position from other soldiers serving in the British Army before that date. The difference in pension arrangements reflected the different historical position of the Gurkhas. Although the High Court accepted that the 2004 change in the Immigration Rules (see paragraph 13 above) undermined some of the assumptions supporting the decision in Purja, it held that the changes did not affect the reasoning of the Court of Appeal as that reasoning applied to the calculation of pension entitlements which accrued before 1 July 1997. For all the reasons advanced by the High Court Judge in Gurung, the High Court considered that the choice of 1 July 1997 to mark the boundary for different treatment of accrued pension was a rational and reasonable one.
38. The applicants were granted permission to appeal to the Court of Appeal. On appeal, their case was put exclusively by reference to Article 14 of the Convention read together with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
39. On 13 October 2010 the Court of Appeal dismissed the applicants’ appeal. In respect of the discrimination-on-grounds-of-nationality claim the Court of Appeal, like the High Court, considered itself bound by the decision in Purja (cited above). In respect of the age-discrimination claim the court, relying on the Strasbourg Court’s judgment in Neill v. the United Kingdom, no. 56721/00, 29 January 2002, held that even if a relevant comparison could be drawn between older and younger Gurkhas, the Ministry of Defence could easily justify the difference in treatment.
40. On 13 December 2010 the Supreme Court refused to grant the applicants permission to appeal.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. R (Purja and Others) v. Ministry of Defence [2003] EWCA Civ 1345
41. In Purja and Others, which concerned a challenge to the GPS brought prior to the 2004 changes to the Immigration Rules and the GOTT, the complainants submitted, inter alia, that the difference in pension rates between Gurkha and non-Gurkha soldiers was irrational and constituted direct discrimination on the grounds of nationality.
42. The High Court dismissed their complaints. In relation to the discrimination complaint, it held that the situation of Gurkha soldiers on retirement was not analogous to that of their non-Gurkha counterparts and some difference in treatment was therefore justified.
43. The complainants appealed to the Court of Appeal. In dismissing the appeal, Simon Brown LJ stated:
“... not only are Gurkhas, as the judge there observed, ‘leaving the United Kingdom and returning to Nepal, where their pensions will be paid, and conditions in Nepal are markedly different from those in the United Kingdom’, but it must be borne in mind too that these pensions are generally payable from a much earlier age. Whether that consideration - that the Gurkhas’ pensions become payable immediately after 15 years whereas British soldiers only receive theirs after 22 years or (in 83% of cases) at the age of 60 – is to be regarded as a) demonstrating that the two groups are not ‘in an analogous or relatively similar situation’ or b) providing ‘reasonable or objective justification’ for the distinction between their respective pension rates, or perhaps even c) suggesting that British soldiers are not after all enjoying ‘preferential treatment’ (all these phrases being taken from Stubbings – see paragraph 43 above), seems to me a matter of choice and ultimately immaterial.
59. The question directly raised by article 14 is whether the Gurkhas’ pension rights are ‘secured without discrimination on [the] ground [of] national ... origin’, which to my mind translates into the question whether, in regard to their pension rights, they have been unjustifiably less well treated than others because of their being Nepalese.
60. It can of course be said that it is only because they are Nepalese that the Gurkhas will be retiring to Nepal and living there more cheaply than their British counterparts. But I reject entirely the proposition that they are therefore to be regarded as unjustifiably less well treated on the ground of their nationality. It is, of course, only because they are Nepalese that they are recruited into the Gurkha Brigade in the first place. Nor am I impressed by [the claimants’] argument that because, say, an Irish or Jamaican (dual) national will be discharged from the British Army with a pension calculated without reference to wherever he may be intending to retire, so too should a Gurkha. I simply cannot recognise the two groups as being in ‘an analogous or relevantly similar situation’ looking at the nature of the Gurkha Brigade as a whole – the basis and circumstances of the Gurkhas’ recruitment, service and discharge.”
44. Chadwick LJ drew attention to five features distinguishing the situation of Gurkha soldiers from non-Gurkha soldiers:
“84. It is enough to draw attention to the following: (i) Gurkha soldiers are recruited, exclusively, from Nepal, under arrangements to which the governments of Nepal and India have given approval; (ii) Gurkha soldiers are, invariably, discharged in Nepal at the end of their service, and have no right of abode in the United Kingdom; (iii) Gurkha soldiers will, almost invariably, complete 15 years’ service and retire on pension (payable with immediate effect) at or about the age of 35 years; (iv) there is an obvious, and recognised, need in those circumstances to foster and maintain links between Gurkha soldiers while in service and the country (Nepal) to which they will return on retirement; and (v) that need is enhanced by the wide social, economic and cultural differences between Nepal and the United Kingdom – and between Nepal and the other countries throughout the world in which Gurkha soldiers have been, or are likely to be, required to serve.
85. Taking those matters into account I find it impossible to reach the conclusion that the characteristics of soldiers serving in Gurkha units in the British Army are so closely analogous to the characteristics of soldiers serving in non-Gurkha units in the same Army that the circumstances call for a positive justification for the different treatment, in relation to basic pay and pensions, for which Gurkha TACOS provide. Once it is appreciated that there are good reasons for the payment of an immediate pension to Gurkha soldiers after 15 years’ service – as, plainly, there are, given the fact that Gurkha soldiers will return to Nepal on completion of their service - rather than a deferred pension payable at age 60 on retirement after less than 22 years’ service, or an immediate pension only after 22 years’ service, it seems obvious that the amount of the immediate pension payable to Gurkha soldiers will differ from the immediate, or the deferred, pension payable to non-Gurkha soldiers ...”
B. R (Gurung and Others) v. Ministry of Defence [2008] EWHC 1496 (Admin)
45. In Gurung and Others the complainants submitted that the pension policy adopted by the Government in the GOTT was irrational and resulted in a form of indirect age discrimination. The Article 14 challenge was based solely on the transfer value of the years of service before 1 July 1997 and related to the effect which the differences in transfer value created between groups of Gurkhas based on age and on their individual length of service at particular dates.
46. In its judgment the High Court had regard to the difficulty faced by the authorities in fixing the transitional arrangements following the decision to bring the Gurkhas’ pensions into line with those of other soldiers serving in the British Army. It stated:
“Transitional arrangements were required for those already in the GPS who might wish to transfer. Provision had to be made for the Gurkha who retired after 1st July 1997 under the GPS and was already in receipt of that pension but who still wished to transfer to the AFPS. The question was how the pension pot in the GPS should be transferred: at actuarial value or at a Year for Year value or a mixture of the two. The fact that the terms of service before 1st July 1997, and the pension arrangements, were fit for the previous assumption, as Purja held, obviously creates a problem for those whose years of service spanned that date. The first option would undervalue the years of service after 1st July 1997 by reference to the actual pay received with the [universal addition], and by comparison with the value earned in their pension pots by the rest of the British Army to whom, after that date, the same retirement assumptions now could be applied. The second, although not itself irrational, would give to the transferring Gurkha an enhancement to his pension not just by reference to its value but also by reference to assumptions inapplicable before 1st July 1997 when the pension or deferred pay was earned. The third, which was adopted, reflected the differences in the assumptions which underlay the pay and pension arrangements before and after 1st July 1997.
...
A distinction within the Brigade between pay and pension before and after 1st July 1997 reflects the point at which the Brigade of Gurkhas became UK based, and the retirement date after which [indefinite leave to enter or remain] became an option. The longer the service after 1997, the greater the personal connection with the UK and the corresponding loosening of the ties with Nepal, the greater the number of years transferred on a Year for Year basis. The converse is also the case: the greater the number of years served before 1997, the greater the ties with Nepal. Although in fact the percentage of retired Gurkhas coming to the UK after retirement between 1997 and 2004 is very high indeed, that does not mean that the pension transfer provision is irrational in not making it financially easier for them to do so. The system is a rough reflection of the degree of the ties with either country in which retirement could be enjoyed. The Year for Year transfer of all pension rights of those retiring after 1st July 1997 would create a sharp distinction between those Gurkhas who retired before and after that date in respect of years of service before that date.
...
The aim of the GOTT was not to allow the Gurkha to retire in the UK on an Immediate Pension at 33 years old free from further labour, nor to allow other servicemen now to do so under the AFPS. Nor was it to require retired or serving Gurkhas to forego the immediate pension to which their TACOS had entitled them, in order that at age 60 or 65 they would receive the preserved pension under the AFPS which is all that 15 years’ service would have entitled them to.”
47. With regard to the question of age discrimination, the court held:
“The grounds of differentiation here, not wholly aptly characterised as those of age, are not suspect grounds. The grounds of difference do not arise because someone is above or below a particular age, but because the introduction of changes which are not directly age related are defined by dates, and years of service. The drawing of lines, by reference to dates, around schemes which help some but not others is an inevitable part of many legislative or policy changes; this is the more so where a past disadvantage or even wrong is being remedied retrospectively. Of course, this means that either the older or younger will be affected; the date itself will import an indirect differentiation on age grounds. But that is a weak starting point for an assertion of indirect discrimination on age grounds. In any event, if there is a rational basis for the selection of the date as at which the changes are made, that disposes of the Article 14 challenge.”
48. Having regard to the generous margin of appreciation where the decision is about social and economic policy, particularly those concerned with the equitable distribution of public resources, the court concluded as follows:
“A line was drawn; that was in itself reasonable, and the particular dates chosen for its drawing are reasonable too. The difference reflects not age in reality but the number of years of service based in the Far East or in the UK. If there was indirect discrimination on the grounds of age or ‘other status’, it was justified and proportionate.”
49. Consequently, the High Court dismissed the application for judicial review.
THE LAW
I. PRELIMINARY ISSUE: VICTIM STATUS
50. It is necessary to address at the outset the matter of the “victim” status of the first applicant. The British Gurkha Welfare Society is a non governmental organisation, comprised of 399 retired Gurkhas, which had standing before the domestic courts in the litigation concerning the subject-matter of the present case. Nevertheless, the Court has held that “victim” status must be interpreted autonomously, irrespective of its meaning under domestic law, and according to established case-law it will normally only be granted to an association if the latter has been directly affected by the measure in question (see Association des amis de Saint Raphaël et de Fréjus et autres v. France (dec.), no. 45053/98, 29 February 2000; Dayras and Others and the association “SOS Sexisme” v. France, (dec.), no. 65390/01, 6 January 2005; and Grande Oriente d’Italia di Palazzo Giustiniani v. Italy (no.2), no. 26740/02, § 20, 31 May 2007).
51. Although its 399 members were “directly affected” by the GOTT, the British Gurkha Welfare Society does not appear to have been “directly affected” by the measure in its own right. It is therefore doubtful whether it can claim to be a “victim” of the alleged violations within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention. However, in view of the Court’s conclusions on the merits of the applicants’ complaints, there is no need to reach any firm conclusion in this regard.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION TAKEN IN CONJUCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1
52. The applicants complained that the significantly lower pension entitlement of Gurkha soldiers who retired or served before 1 July 1997 amounted to differential treatment on the basis of nationality, race and age. They complained that the difference in treatment could not be justified and, as such, represented a violation of Article 14 read together with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
53. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
54. Article 14 reads as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
55. The Government contested those arguments.
A. Admissibility
1. The “race discrimination” complaint
56. The Government argued that, insofar as the applicants now seek to complain about race discrimination, they have failed to exhaust domestic remedies as no such claim was pursued before the High Court or the Court of Appeal.
57. Although the applicants accepted that in the domestic proceedings the allegation of race discrimination was eventually dropped, they contended that in the present case the link between nationality and race was strong and, as a consequence, the Court should not adopt an overly formalistic approach to the exhaustion of domestic remedies.
58. The Court cannot accept the applicants’ submission. In Article 14 of the Convention “race” and “national origin” are identified as two distinct grounds of discrimination. It is true that in a given case the two might be “strongly connected”; however, as different considerations might be relevant to each, it does not necessarily follow that complaints under both grounds will stand or fall together. Consequently, the existence of any such “connection” between the two grounds cannot absolve an applicant from raising each separately before the domestic courts.
59. Consequently, given that the applicants, by their own admission, did not pursue their claim of discrimination on grounds of race before the domestic courts, this part of their complaint must be rejected as inadmissible in accordance with Article 35 §§ 1 and 4 of the Convention for failure to exhaust domestic remedies (see, for example, Vu?kovi? and Others v. Serbia (preliminary objection) [GC], nos. 17153/11 and 29 others, § 72, 25 March 2014).
2. The remaining complaints
60. The Court considers that the applicants’ remaining complaints (namely, those concerning differential treatment on the grounds of nationality and age) raise sufficiently complex issues of fact and law, so that they cannot be rejected as manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It is further satisfied that they are not inadmissible on any other ground. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The Court’s general approach in Article 14 cases
61. The Court has repeatedly held that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not guarantee as such any right to become the owner of property; nor does it guarantee, as such, any right to a pension of a particular amount (see, among many authorities, Andrejeva v. Latvia [GC], no. 55707/00, § 77, ECHR 2009). If, however, a Contracting State does decide to create a pension scheme, it must do so in a manner which is compatible with Article 14 (see Stec and Others, cited above, § 55).
62. As established in the Court’s case-law, only differences in treatment based on an identifiable characteristic, or “status”, are capable of amounting to discrimination within the meaning of Article 14 (see Kjeldsen, Busk Madsen and Pedersen v. Denmark, 7 December 1976, § 56, Series A no. 23). Moreover, in order for an issue to arise under Article 14 there must be a difference in the treatment of persons in analogous, or relevantly similar, situations (see D.H. and Others v. the Czech Republic [GC], no. 57325/00, § 175, ECHR 2007-IV, and Burden v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 13378/05, § 60, ECHR 2008). Such a difference in treatment is discriminatory if it has no objective and reasonable justification; in other words, if it does not pursue a legitimate aim or if there is not a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised. The Contracting State enjoys a margin of appreciation in assessing whether and to what extent differences in otherwise similar situations justify a different treatment (see Burden, cited above, § 60). The scope of this margin will vary according to the circumstances, the subject matter and the background. As a general rule, very weighty reasons would have to be put forward before the Court could regard a difference in treatment based exclusively on the ground of nationality as compatible with the Convention (see Gaygusuz v. Austria, 16 September 1996, § 42, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996 IV, and Andrejeva v. Latvia [GC], no. 55707/00, § 87, ECHR 2009). However, a wide margin is usually allowed to the State under the Convention when it comes to general measures of economic or social strategy. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is in the public interest on social or economic grounds, and the Court will generally respect the legislature’s policy choice unless it is “manifestly without reasonable foundation” (see Carson and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 42184/05, § 61, ECHR 2010 and Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 52, ECHR 2006-VI).
63. The Court observes at the outset that, as with most if not all complaints of alleged discrimination in a welfare or pensions system, the issue before it for consideration goes to the compatibility of the system with Article 14, not to the individual facts or circumstances of the particular applicants or of others who are or might be affected by the legislation (see, for example, Carson and Others, cited above, § 62; Stec and Others, cited above, §§ 50-67; Burden, cited above, §§ 58-66; and Andrejeva, cited above, §§ 74-92). Rather, the Court’s role is to determine the question of principle, namely whether the legislation as such unlawfully discriminates between persons who are in an analogous situation (Carson and Others, cited above, § 62).
2. Application to the present case
64. The Government have accepted that the facts underlying the present complaint fall within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Furthermore, they do not dispute that nationality and age are protected grounds of discrimination.
65. Consequently, what is in dispute in the present case is whether there was a difference in the treatment of persons in relevantly similar situations; and, if so, whether that difference in treatment had any objective and reasonable justification.
(a) Discrimination on grounds of national origin
(i) The applicants’ submissions
66. In the applicants’ submission, they had been treated unfavourably compared with non-Gurkha soldiers in the British Army of an equivalent rank and position, with whom they had stood shoulder to shoulder, serving the same cause, defending the same nation, and facing the same risks and dangers with the same valour, commitment, passion and dedication; and this difference in treatment was on account of their Nepalese nationality.
67. In particular, the applicants maintained that their pension entitlements were less favourable than those of non-Gurkha soldiers in the British Army, as their service prior to 1 July 1997 was valued at as little as twenty-three per cent of the service of other soldiers serving at the same time. The applicants did not accept the contents of the actuarial report submitted by the Government (see paragraph 70 below), which suggested that the majority of them would not be in a significantly better position had they been treated as if they were always members of the AFPS. In response, the applicants submitted their own actuarial report commenting on the data, methodology and assumptions employed in the Government’s report. The applicants’ actuary indicated that the comparisons relied on in the Government’s report were “only a single snapshot that depends on both the time at which it is calculated and the assumptions that are made”. In other words, as the relevant calculations depended on assumptions relating to exchange rates and life expectancy, different results would be seen if the assumptions were to be made at a different time.
68. The applicants further argued that there was no objective and reasonable justification for the difference in treatment. In this regard, they considered the fact that, prior to 1 July 1997, the Brigade’s home base had been in Hong Kong (and before that, Malaya) to be immaterial as the Brigade was at all times eligible for deployment on any British Army mission in any country in the world. Likewise, they contended that the fact that Gurkhas historically retired to Nepal was not logically connected to the pension that they should receive for the service they rendered. Once it was acknowledged that Gurkhas served the British Army in the same way as other soldiers, it was inescapable logic that they should receive the same pension. This was particularly so given that a pension was a form of deferred pay, and where a worker comes from and how they spend their income should be irrelevant to the level of remuneration that they receive.
69. Finally, the applicants contended that discrimination on grounds of nationality was considered to have “specially protected status” and therefore “very weighty reasons” would be required by way of justification. The Government could not, therefore, rely on budgetary considerations to justify treating the applicants differently from other members of the British Army. Likewise, the fact that Gurkhas could chose to retire in Nepal was not a relevant factor, as the rate of pension should be set by reference to work done and not to a person’s life options.
(ii) The Government’s submissions
70. The Government submitted a report by the Government Actuarial Department (“GAD”) which indicated that most of the applicants would not now be in a significantly better position if they had been treated as if they had always been members of the AFPS. This was because pension payments under the GPS were payable immediately upon retirement, whereas an immediate pension under the AFPS was only payable after twenty-two years’ service and most (non-Gurkha) army personnel did not serve that long. Consequently, most of the applicants would receive pension payments for over twenty-five years before many non-Gurkha soldiers of the same rank and length of service would qualify for any payments under the AFPS. According to the Government, an immediate pension at the age of thirty-three was not necessarily worth less than a larger, deferred pension at the age of 60. In fact, the GAD report indicated that of the 308 applicants the Ministry of Defence had been able to identify, approximately four per cent would have been in a better position had they been treated as members of the AFPS throughout their service. This group mostly consisted of officers, who would have been entitled to AFPS benefits immediately upon retirement.
71. Insofar as this small minority of applicants had been the subject of adverse differential treatment in the way their pensions were calculated for periods of service prior to 1 July 1997, the Government acknowledged that the difference was on grounds of nationality. However, they contended that either the applicants could not be said to be in a relevantly similar position to other soldiers in the British Army in relation to the accrual of their pension rights for periods of service prior to 1 July 1997, or, if they were, the difference in treatment had an objective and reasonable justification.
72. In particular, they noted that, until the changes to the Immigration Rules in 2004 and 2009, retired Gurkhas had no entitlement to settle in the United Kingdom after the end of their service. It was therefore presumed that they would retire in Nepal, where their GPS pension would be paid earlier than an AFPS pension and, given the significant difference between the economic conditions in the two countries, would, in real terms, be much more valuable than the equivalent sums paid in the United Kingdom.
73. Although the Government accepted that a pension was a form of deferred pay, they pointed out that the applicants had “definitively acquired” the relevant portion of their pension rights prior to 1 July 1997, at a time when the Brigade’s home base was not in the United Kingdom, they had no entitlement to accompanied service there, and they had no right to settle there upon retirement. Consequently, they had very limited ties to the United Kingdom during this period. The Government rejected the applicants’ assertion that pay could only lawfully be set by reference to work undertaken, with the consequence that the place where the worker was receiving his pay (and by extension, his pension) was irrelevant. On the contrary, many public-service and private-sector jobs in the United Kingdom had a “London weighting” to reflect the higher cost of living in that city.
74. In any case, the Government pointed out that although many Gurkhas were now entitled to settle in the United Kingdom, they were not obliged to do so: unlike any other soldier in the British Army, they retained the right to retire in Nepal. Consequently, the Government argued that it was not obliged to fund a fully retrospective increase in their pensions on a year-for-year basis on the assumption that they would choose to settle in the United Kingdom rather than return home. This was especially the case given that many Gurkhas who opted to settle in the United Kingdom went on to enjoy a second career there, which produced an income from which they could meet their living expenses.
75. Finally, the Government contended that the present case raised issues of social and economic policy, and in such cases the Court normally respected the legislature’s policy choice unless it was “manifestly without reasonable foundation” (Stec, cited above, § 52). As in Stec, the Government was trying to put right an inequality and its policy choice in doing so was not “manifestly without reasonable foundation”. This was especially so given that, for the reasons already identified, that policy choice was neither unreasonable nor arbitrary. Furthermore, in allowing pension rights accrued in respect of years of service after 1 July 1997 to be transferred to the AFPS on a year-for-year basis, the Government effectively created an exception to its general policy of non-retrospectivity when it came to the enhancement of pension schemes. However, the cost of equalising all years of service prior to July 1997 for members of the Brigade in service on that date would have cost an additional GBP 320 million, while extending the GOTT to all Gurkhas, including those who retired before 1 July 1997, and valuing their service on a year-for-year basis would have cost in the region of GBP 1.5 billion over twenty years. Moreover, such an approach, if adopted, might have led beneficiaries of other public sector schemes to complain about the non-retrospectivity of any enhancements in their own schemes.
(iii) The Court’s assessment
(?) “Difference in treatment”
76. The Court has established in its case-law that, in order for an issue to arise under Article 14, the first condition is that there must be a difference in the treatment of persons in relevantly similar situations.
77. In the present case Gurkha soldiers were undoubtedly treated differently from other soldiers in the British Army in respect of their entitlement to a pension since, prior to 1997, they were governed by a different pension scheme from other soldiers in the British Army, with different terms and conditions. In addition, for those eligible for transfer to the AFPS, only accrued rights to a pension for years of service after 1 July 1997 were transferred on a year-for-year basis, while accrued rights in respect of years of service prior to that date were transferred at actuarial value (approximately twenty-three to thirty-six percent of the value of a year’s service of a non-Gurkha soldier of equivalent rank – see paragraph 27 above). However, the notion of discrimination implies that the group in question was not only treated differently, but also less favourably (see, for example, Elsholz v. Germany [GC], no. 25735/94, §§ 60-61, ECHR 2000 VIII), and in the present case the Government contend that this criterion was not met as the vast majority of Gurkhas (both those who retired before 1 July 1997 and those who retired on or after that date) would not have been in a significantly better financial position if they had been treated as if they had always been in the AFPS.
78. This latter submission by the Government is based on the GAD’s actuarial report, which is contested by the applicants who have submitted their own actuarial report challenging the data, methodology and assumptions employed in the GAD report (see paragraph 67 above). Whether or not the applicants’ objections in this respect are justified, the Court notes that the GAD report expressly accepts that Gurkha soldiers of officer rank or above (roughly four per cent of the total) would have been in a significantly better financial position had they been able to transfer all years of service to the AFPS on a year-for-year basis. Furthermore, in the 2004 review conducted by the Secretary of State for Defence it was conceded that Gurkhas generally were “clearly” wronged under the GPS in the changed context of a likely second career in the United Kingdom, in that the GPS paid “sums too small to be useful at a time when [the Gurkha] does not need them and an inadequate pension at retirement age” (see paragraph 23 above). Therefore, even if the total sum of pension payments received by a Gurkha who was not of officer rank would not have been less than the total sum received by his non-Gurkha counterpart, the authorities have acknowledged that what the 2004 review called the different “pension benefit profiles” of Gurkha soldiers were less advantageous. The Court is therefore satisfied that Gurkha soldiers can be regarded as having been treated less favourably in respect of their pension entitlement than other soldiers in the British Army.
(?) “Persons in relevantly similar situations”
79. Article 14 also requires that any difference in treatment be between persons in “relevantly similar situations”. In this regard, the Court notes that the historical situation of the Gurkhas was very different from that of other soldiers in the British Army as they were based in the Far East, had no ties to the United Kingdom, and no expectation of settling there following their discharge. However, their situation has significantly changed over time. Most importantly, on 1 July 1997 their home base moved to the United Kingdom (see paragraph 8 above); in 2004 the Immigration Rules were amended to allow Gurkhas with at least four years’ service retiring on or after 1 July 1997 to apply for settlement in the United Kingdom after discharge (see paragraph 13 above); in 2006 the policy on Married Accompanied Service was changed, allowing the wives and children of Gurkha soldiers to also form ties to the United Kingdom (see paragraph 9 above); and finally, in 2009 the Immigration Rules were again amended to permit all Gurkha soldiers with at least four years’ service to apply for settlement in the United Kingdom (see paragraph 14 above).
80. In view of these developments, the Court accepts that by the date of the GOTT, namely 2007 (see paragraph 25 above), Gurkha soldiers were in a “relevantly similar situation” to other soldiers in the British Army.
(?) “Objectively and reasonably justified”
81. It is common ground that where an alleged difference in treatment was on grounds of nationality (see paragraph 71 above), very weighty reasons have to be put forward before it can be regarded as compatible with the Convention (see Gaygusuz, cited above, § 42, and Andrejeva, cited above, § 87). However, in considering whether such “very weighty reasons” exist, the Court must be mindful of the wide margin usually allowed to the State under the Convention when it comes to general measures of economic or social strategy. That is particularly so where an alleged difference in treatment resulted from a transitional measure forming part of a scheme for the enhancement of a benefit which was carried out in good faith in order to correct an inequality. For example, in Neill and Others v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 56721/00 of 29 January 2002, the Court recognised that, in making provision for the future payment of service pensions to servicemen and to their widows, national authorities were in principle permitted to restrict entitlement to such pensions to those who were still in service at the time of introduction of the new provisions, and to fix the level of entitlement by reference to the period of service completed following introduction of the relevant provisions.
82. In the present case, following a number of the developments set out at paragraph 79 above, the authorities accepted (in 2004) that the situation of Gurkhas had changed, so that differences in the majority of their terms and conditions of service (including their pension entitlement) could no longer be justified on legal and moral grounds (see paragraph 22 above). As a consequence, the 2007 GOTT was formulated in order to bring Gurkhas’ pensions into line with those of other soldiers in the British Army. However, having decided to allow the Gurkhas to transfer to the AFPS, the authorities were faced with a decision: whether to allow the transfer to the AFPS of pension rights accrued in respect of all years of service on a year-for-year basis; whether to allow only the transfer of pension rights accrued in respect of all years of service on an actuarial basis; or to find a middle ground.
83. It would appear that the first option was rejected for financial reasons: in this respect, the Government have estimated the cost of equalising all years of service prior to 1997 for all Gurkhas serving on that date to be in the region of GBP 320 million, and the cost of extending the GOTT to those Gurkhas who retired before that date (with accrued pension rights valued on a year-for-year basis) to be GBP 1.5 billion over twenty years. The second option was also rejected, because it would have undervalued those years of service acquired at a time when the historical assumption that the Gurkhas would retire to Nepal no longer held good. Consequently, the authorities opted for the third approach, allowing only the transfer of pension rights accrued after 1 July 1997 on a year-for-year basis, and, in doing so, made an exception to their general policy of not enhancing pension schemes retrospectively.
84. The selection of 1 July 1997 as a “cut-off point” was not arbitrary. This date represented the transfer of the Gurkhas’ home base to the United Kingdom and was therefore the date from which the Gurkhas starting forming ties with that country. Those who retired before that date had no ties to the United Kingdom and, at the date of the GOTT (2007), had no right to settle there. Although this changed following the 2009 amendment to the Immigration Rules, the applicants agreed before the domestic courts that this development – which post-dated both the GOTT and the commencement of the domestic proceedings in the present case – was irrelevant (see paragraph 34 above). Consequently, the Court finds no cause to doubt the conclusion of the 2004 review that the GPS continued to be the best scheme to meet the needs of these Gurkhas, since the payments under that scheme, which were available immediately upon retirement, were more than adequate to provide for their retirement in Nepal (see paragraph 23 above).
85. For those Gurkhas who retired after 1 July 1997, any pension entitlement accrued prior to that date was accrued at a time when they had no ties to the United Kingdom and no expectation of settling there following their discharge from the Army. It is true that the majority of Gurkhas falling into this category did subsequently settle in the United Kingdom (see paragraph 13 above). Nevertheless, in considering the impact of the GOTT on their financial situation, it must be borne in mind that the purpose of an armed forces pension scheme (either under the AFPS or GPS) was not to enable the soldier to live without other sources of income following retirement from the Army. Given that most Gurkhas retired after fifteen years, and the majority of other soldiers in the British Army retired before they had served for twenty-two years, it was fully expected that they would continue to be economically active and have other sources of income once they left the armed forces. In fact, the evidence submitted by the Government indicates that many of those Gurkhas who retired after 1 July 1997 and who remained in the United Kingdom have gone on to find other gainful employment there (see paragraph 74 above).
86. Unlike the situation in Neill (cited above), the Gurkhas’ pensions under the GPS were index-linked to their expected country of retirement. However, the Court finds no support for the applicants’ argument that pensions should not be index-linked in this way. In Carson (cited above, § 86) the Court expressly recognised that it was difficult to draw any genuine comparison between the position of pensioners living in different countries on account of the range of economic and social variables applying from country to country. Moreover, in their submissions to the Court, the parties have agreed that pensions are a form of deferred salary, and many employers – both at the domestic and international level – regularly adjust salaries to reflect the cost of living in the city or country of employment.
87. In light of the aforementioned findings, the Court considers that insofar as the applicants have complained of discrimination on grounds of nationality, any difference in treatment was objectively and reasonably justified. Consequently, no violation of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 can be found on the facts of the present case.
(b) Discrimination on grounds of age
88. The Court has recognised that age might constitute “other status” for the purposes of Article 14 of the Convention (see, for example, Schwizgebel v. Switzerland, no. 25762/07, § 85, ECHR 2010 (extracts)), although it has not, to date, suggested that discrimination on grounds of age should be equated with other “suspect” grounds of discrimination. Nevertheless, even if it were accepted that “older” Gurkhas were treated less favourably than “younger” Gurkhas on account of their age, the differential treatment, which also flows from the decision to value only service after 1 July 1997 on a “year-for-year” basis, must be regarded as objectively and reasonably justified for the reasons given in relation to the applicants’ complaint concerning discrimination on grounds of nationality (see paragraphs 82 – 87 above).
89. The foregoing considerations are sufficient to enable the Court to conclude that the applicants’ complaint concerning age discrimination also discloses no violation of Article 14 of the Convention read together with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the complaints concerning discrimination on grounds of national origin and age admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;

2. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 14 of the Convention read together with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 15 September, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Abel Campos Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska
Registrar President
 

AVVISO IMPORTANTE
da leggere con attenzione prima di esaminare la sentenza

Le sentenze della Corte Europea sono liberamente disponibili sul sito ufficiale della Corte.

La Corte Europea, pero',   pronuncia le sue sentenze soltanto in lingua francese ed a volte in lingua inglese.


Per consentire agli espropriati che non conoscono queste lingue di avere un'idea di cio' che dice la Corte Europea, l'Associazione ha attivato un software di traduzione automatica delle sentenze; molte delle sentenze segnalate agli espropriati sono, quindi,  tradotte prevalentemente con programmi di traduzione automatica che, sebbene di qualita' molto elevata, servono soltanto a dare  un'idea di cio' che dice la Corte Europea a chi non conosce la lingua.
Chi fosse interessato ad un documento perfettamente tradotto, deve rivolgersi ad un traduttore specializzato in testi giuridici; se non ne dispone, puo' chiedere all'Associazione di segnalargliene uno; si badi pero' che i testi in italiano, anche se tradotti da un traduttore specializzato, non sono testi ufficiali.


Si ricorda che i testi ufficiali sono esclusivamente quelli in lingua francese o inglese e che gli Avvocati e i Tecnici che assistono gli espropriati devono utilizzarli esclusivamente nelle lingue ufficiali.
 

NOTE
I dati identificativi dei soggetti privati vengono omessi in ottemperanza alle disposizioni di legge (art 52 comma 1 d.lgs. 30 giugno 196, c.d. legge sulla privacy); questo repertorio e' un'appendice dell'opera I Diritti degli Espropriati - quali sono - come evolvono - norme italiane e norme europee - gli obblighi della P.A. - le posizioni dei Giudici, e pu?essere utilizzato senza alcun costo e senza limitazioni.



Conclusioni: Resto inammissibile (Articolo 35-1 - l'Esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali) Nessuna violazione di Articolo 14+P1-1-1 - Proibizione della discriminazione (Articolo 14 - la Discriminazione) (Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà Articolo 1 par. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà)



PRIMA SEZIONE






CAUSA GURKHA WELFARE SOCIETÀ BRITANNICA ED ALTRI C. REGNO UNITO

(Richiesta n. 44818/11)










SENTENZA




STRASBOURG

15 settembre 2016


Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Gurkha Welfare Società britannica ed Altri c. il Regno Unito,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, Presidente
Ledi Bianku,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Paul Mahoney,
Aleš Pejchal,
Robert Spano,
Pauliine Koskelo, giudici
ed Abel Campos, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 23 agosto 2016,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 44818/11) contro il Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e l'Irlanda Settentrionale depositato con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) 10 giugno 2011 della Gurkha Welfare Società britannica, un'associazione di unincorporated non-governativa che agisce in favore di 399 veterani di Gurkha, OMISSIS una giuntura cittadino del Nepal e britannico nato nel 1953, ed OMISSIS, un cittadino del Nepal nato nel 1960 (“i richiedenti”).
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati col Sig. E. Cooper di più Ardesia e Gordon (Regno Unito) LLP (precedentemente Russell Jones & Walker i Procuratori legali), un avvocato che pratica a Londra. Il Regno Unito Governo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra A. McLeod dell'Estero e Repubblica Ufficio.
3. 16 gennaio 2013 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
4. I fatti della causa, siccome presentato con le parti, può essere riassunto siccome segue.
A. Lo sfondo storico
5. Soldati di Gurkha del Nepal notificano la Corona dal 1815, inizialmente come soldati nel (britannico) Esercito indiano. L'indipendenza indiana e seguente nel 1947, sei reggimenti di Gurkha furono trasferiti all'Esercito indiano, mentre quattro reggimenti divennero una parte integrante dell'Esercito britannico. Più di 200,000 soldati di Gurkha lottarono nelle due guerre mondiali, e nei cinquanta anni passati che loro hanno notificato a Hong Kong, Malaysia, Borneo, Cipro, il Falklands, Kosovo, Iraq e l'Afghanistan. Loro hanno notificato in una varietà di ruoli, principalmente nella fanteria ma anche come ingegneri ed in segnala ed unità di logistiche.
6. Oggi, loro formano la Brigata di Gurkhas (“la Brigata”) in che solamente cittadini di Nepali sono eleggibili per servizio. La Brigata non è una brigata operativa nel senso convenzionale; piuttosto, è un'entità amministrativa che assicura che unità di Gurkha nelle quali tutti i soldati di Gurkha sono arruolati e notificano, è in grado essere integrato in-e parte di forma di-le altre brigate operative nell'Esercito britannico.
7. La Brigata fu basata originalmente nell'Estremo Oriente, nella regione precedentemente noto come Malaya. Nel 1971 la base della Brigata si trasferì a Hong Kong. Sul completamento del handover di Hong Kong a Cina a luglio 1997, la base di casa si trasferì al Regno Unito. La maggioranza di Gurkhas è collocata attualmente di conseguenza, nel Regno Unito, benché dal 1962 una sezione della Brigata sia collocata in Brunei.
B. I Clausole e condizioni di Gurkhas di Servizio (o “TACOS”)
1. Salario
8. Facendo seguito ad un memorandum di capire di 9 novembre 1947 (“l'Accordo Tripartito”), i Governi del Regno Unito, India ed il Nepal concordarono che il salario di Gurkhas che notifica nell'Esercito britannico sarebbe stato esposto con riferimento a tassi fatti domanda con l'India in riguardo di soldati indiani così come evitare la competizione fra gli eserciti indiani e britannici per le reclute di Gurkha. La Brigata di base paghi fu esposto perciò in conformità con l'indiano Pay Codice, benché assegni costare-di-viventi fossero pagati per servizio fuori del Nepal. Questi assegni erano calcolati con riferimento a spese viventi e locali (per esempio, in Hong Kong o il Brunei), ma nel 1997, quando la base di casa della Brigata si trasferì al Regno Unito, un “universale oltre” fu introdotto per assicurare che, ogni qualvolta un soldato di Gurkha stava notificando fuori del Nepal, la sua paga netta sarebbe simile a che di un non-Gurkha soldato nell'Esercito britannico di comparabile classifichi ed esperimenti. Comunque, il “universale oltre” non fu trattato come pensionabile paghi.
2. Servizio accompagnato
9. Prima di 1 aprile 2006, diritto di Servizio Accompagnato e Sposato (quel è, un diritto per il soldato per essere accompagnato con moglie e figli) era per uno sposato giro accompagnato di fra due e tre anni nei primi quindici anni di servizio e per servizio accompagnato e permanente per Gurkhas Colore Sergente classificò e sopra. Comunque, con effetto da 1 aprile 2006, quelli che notificavano da tre anni o più nella Brigata furono concessi a Servizio Accompagnato e Sposato (nelle altre parole, loro furono concessi per essere congiunti nel Regno Unito con le loro mogli e figli,).
3. Età di pensionamento
10. I soldati di Gurkha sono costretti ad andare in pensione dopo che il ' di quindici anni riparano, soggetto alla possibilità, dipendente su fila, di uno o proroghe più annuali.
11. Rispetto, gli altri soldati nell'Esercito britannico sono concessi per notificare per ventidui anni.
4. L'eleggibilità per accordo nel Regno Unito
12. Storicamente, i soldati di Gurkha furono assolti a Nepal e si presunse che loro sarebbero rimasti durante pensionamento là.
(un) I 2004 emendamenti agli Articoli di Immigrazione
13. 25 ottobre 2004 l'Immigrazione Decide (HC 394) fu cambiato per permettere i soldati di Gurkha con almeno il servizio di ' di quattro anni su che andò in pensione o dopo 1 luglio 1997 (la data che la base di casa del Gurkha ha trasferito al Regno Unito) fare domanda per accordo nel Regno Unito. Approssimativamente 90 per cento dei 2,230 soldati di Gurkha eleggibili hanno fatto domanda da allora con successo stabilire nel Regno Unito con le loro persone a carico qualificative.
(b) I 2009 emendamenti agli Articoli di Immigrazione
14. In 21 maggio 2009 il Ministro di Stato per il Casa Settore annunciò una politica nuova sotto la quale tutti i Gurkhas precedenti che notificavano nell'Esercito britannico da almeno quattro anni sarebbero eleggibili per accordo nel Regno Unito. Approssimativamente trenta-cinque per cento di quegli eleggibile ha fatto domanda da allora per ristabilimento nel Regno Unito.
5. Assegni una pensione a diritto
15. L'Accordo Tripartito previde che le pensioni di Gurkhas che notifica nell'Esercito britannico sarebbero esposte anche con riferimento ai tassi fatti domanda con l'India ad indiano soldati.
(un) Il Gurkha Pensione Schema
16. Nel 1949 il Gurkha Pensione Schema (“GPS”) fu stabilito con Garanzia Reale e fece domanda il Codice delle Pensioni dell'Esercito indiano e precedente a Gurkhas che notifica nella Brigata. Assegni una pensione a diritti sotto il GPS fu indice-collegato al costo di vivere in Nepal come fu presunto che i Gurkhas sarebbero andati in pensione là. Pensioni immediatamente erano pagabili su pensionamento e non potevano essere differite. Un Gurkha che andò in pensione senza avere notificato quindici anni sarebbe concesso qualsiasi a nessuna pensione.
17. Nel 1981 le pensioni di Gurkha furono fatte una rassegna ed il tasso pagabile sia esposto al tasso più alto applicabile sotto le disposizioni di pensione di Esercito indiane.
18. Nel 1999, seguendo una revisione ministeriale, i tassi applicabile alle pensioni di Gurkhas nella Brigata fu aumentato entro più di 100 per cento, mentre prendendoli sulle scale espose con l'Esercito indiano. La base razionale per l'aumento era che un Gurkha che andò in pensione dalla Brigata a Nepal non riceverebbe il beneficio di vari schemi che fanno il soldato andando in pensione dall'Esercito indiano potrebbe accedere, come la disposizione di certi installazioni medici. L'aumento fece domanda ad ogni Gurkhas nonostante la data di pagamento.
(b) Lo Schema della Pensione delle Forze armate
19. Non-Gurkha soldati che vanno in pensione dall'Esercito britannico sono concessi sotto o a pensioni le Forze armate Pensioni Schema 1975 (“AFPS 75”) o le Forze armate Assegnano una pensione a Schema 2005 (“AFPS 05”) dipendendo su quando loro cominciarono servizio. Nessuno schema è indice collegato col costo di vivere nel paese del soldato di origine.
20. Sotto l'AFPS, soldati sono eleggibili per pensioni differite, pagabile all'età di 60, purché che loro hanno reso almeno il ' di due anni riparano prima di lasciare l'Esercito britannico. Per ricevere un ufficiali di pensione immediati notificare per sedici anni e tutte le altre file è richiesto è costretto a notificare per ventidui anni; comunque, in pratica meno che uno quinto di non-Gurkha soldati nell'Esercito britannico notificano per periodi sufficientemente lunghi per essere eleggibile per una pensione immediata.
21. Il diritto di pensione annuale sotto il GPS è largamente equivalente-prendendo in considerazione le rettifiche rese nel 1981 e 1999-ad un terzo di che sotto l'AFPS.
(il c) Faccia una rassegna di Clausole e condizioni di Gurkhas di Servizio
22. Seguendo l'emendamento del 2004 all'Immigrazione Decide (veda paragrafo 13 sopra), il Ministro di Stato per Difesa annunciò una revisione dei Gurkhas ' Clausole e condizioni di Servizio. La revisione notò che l'emendamento del 2004 all'Immigrazione Decide ed i cambi a Servizio Accompagnato e Sposato (veda paragrafo 9 sopra) aveva cambiato l'assunzione tradizionale che Gurkhas britannici andrebbero in pensione in Nepal, e puntuto ad un futuro nel quale loro in modo crescente potrebbero essere aspettatisi riguardo al Regno Unito, piuttosto che il Nepal, come la loro base di famiglia. La Revisione Squadra concluse perciò che, l'affordability emette ciononostante, le differenze notevoli in clausole e condizioni di Gurkha di servizio non potrebbero essere giustificate più su motivi legali o morali e raccomandato che loro siano modernizzati con portandoli grandemente in linea con quelli disponibile all'Esercito più ampio.
23. Con riguardo ad a pensioni, la revisione concluse, che su equilibrio il GPS era più appropriato che l'AFPS per sostenere il vita-ciclo della grande maggioranza di Gurkhas su sino a luglio 1997. Comunque, trasportando la base della Brigata al Regno Unito ed il cambio susseguente agli Articoli di Immigrazione aveva alterato il prima assunzione valida che Gurkhas andrebbe in pensione in Nepal. Per un Gurkha che va in pensione ad una seconda carriera nel Regno Unito, il profilo di GPS era,
“chiaramente il male, pagando somme troppo piccolo essere utile ad un tempo quando lui non ha bisogno di loro ed una pensione inadeguata ad età di pensionamento. Come il profilo di vita degli approcci di Gurkha tipici che di cosa uguale di UK/Commonwealth sua, può essere essere detti poco in favore di offrirli con profili di beneficio di pensione così diversi.”
24. Il rapporto raccomandò che notificando ed a membri pensionati della Brigata dovrebbe essere permesso per trasferire dal GPS ad o AFPS 75 o 05, mentre dipendendo su quando loro arruolarono. Quelli che già erano nel GPS e desiderarono rimanere in sé potrebbero fare così, ma sarebbe chiuso con effetto da aprile 2006.
(d) Il Gurkha Offer per Trasferire
25. A marzo 2007 il Regno Unito formulò il Gurkha Offer per Trasferire (“GOTT”) e questo fu dato effetto nelle Forze armate (Gurkha Pension) Ordine 2007 (“l'Ordine del 2007”). Gurkhas che andò in pensione prima 1 luglio 1997 non qualificò per il GOTT. Comunque, il GOTT abilitò soldati di Gurkha su che andarono in pensione o dopo 1 luglio 1997 trasferire dal GPS ad AFPS 75 o AFPS 05 che dipendono su, quando loro arruolarono nell'Esercito britannico prima. I termini di qualsiasi trasferimento sia simile che i diritti accumulati ad una pensione per servizio dopo 1 luglio 1997 trasferirebbero nello schema di AFPS su una base di anno-per-anno.
26. In riguardo di servizio reso di fronte a 1 luglio 1997 il Memorandum Esplicativo all'Ordine del 2007 spiegato quel
“benché Gurkha ripari da 1 luglio 1997 è trasferibile su una base del uno-per-una, Articolo che 2 L4 offre che pre-1997 che Gurkha ripara conta dipendendo proporzionatamente sulla fila del cessionario. Questa proporzione non è arbitraria: è stato arrivato a dopo il calcolo accurato col Settore dell'Attuario Statale. Rappresenta largamente il valore dei benefici di pre-1997 accumulato nel GPS. Un Gurkha che trasferisce ad o AFPS sarà dato valore di pensione equo per il suo GPS ripari.”
27. Sotto il calcolo attuariale adottato col Governo, il servizio di un anno di fronte a 1 luglio 1997 tradotto-in termini di diritto di pensione-all'equivalente di fra 23 e 36 per cento del valore del servizio di un anno di un non-Gurkha soldato di fila equivalente.
28. La transizione dal GPS all'AFPS per quegli optando di trasferire che già era in ricevuta di una pensione sotto il GPS non li spogliò della loro pensione di GPS esistente che continuerebbe ad essere pagata. Trasferisca all'AFPS attinente accadde a 60 o 65, quando loro ricevettero la pensione conservata. Comunque, siccome loro erano stati in ricevuta della pensione di GPS da circa l'età di trenta-tre, il valore di capitale della pentola di pensione ad età di pensionamento sarebbe ridotto coi pagamenti ricevuti sotto il GPS su a quel la data.
29. Quasi tutto servizio Gurkhas elesse trasferire all'AFPS (solamente 0.3 per cento elessero rimanere nel GPS). Di quelli che erano andati in pensione, ma rimase eleggibile per trasferimento, approssimativamente tre per cento elessero rimanere nel GPS.
C. I richiedenti
30. Il primo richiedente è un'associazione di unincorporated non-governativa che agisce in favore di 399 membri precedenti della Brigata.
31. Il secondo richiedente è un soldato di Gurkha precedente che andò in pensione dalla Brigata 8 febbraio 1997 dopo avere accumulato il servizio di ' di quindici anni. Siccome lui completò il suo servizio prima di 1 luglio 1997, lui è ineleggibile per trasferire qualsiasi dei suoi anni pensionabili ad uno dell'AFPSs. La sua pensione continua ad essere governata col GPS e, come così, è valutato ad approssimativamente cinquanta per cento di che quale un soldato britannico di fila equivalente riceverebbe per lo stesso periodo e tipo di servizio.
32. Il terzo richiedente è un soldato di Gurkha precedente che andò in pensione dalla Brigata 31 luglio 2002 dopo avere accumulato pressocché il servizio di ' di trentun anni. Gli ultimi cinque anni di servizio furono trasferiti nell'AFPS su una base di anno-per-anno. Il precedendo ventisei anni di servizio furono trasferiti sotto un calcolo attuariale facendo seguito all'Ordine del 2007. Sotto che calcolo che il valore pensionabile di ognuno dei suoi anni di servizio è stato riguardato come equivalente ad approssimativamente ventisetti per cento di un anno pensionabile notificato con un soldato britannico di fila equivalente preso parte nello stesso tipo di servizio.
D. procedimenti Nazionali
33. 7 marzo 2008 i richiedenti emisero una richiesta per controllo giurisdizionale nella Corte Alta che impugna la legalità di sia (un) la decisione che Gurkhas che andò in pensione prima di 1 luglio 1997 non sono stati concessi per trasferire i loro diritti di pensione sotto il GPS nell'AFPS e (b) la decisione che, per quelli Gurkhas che andarono in pensione dopo 1 luglio 1997, ripara prima che data non classificò su una base di anno-per-anno. La richiesta fu avanzata su tre motivi: sotto le Razza Relazioni Atto 1976 (vale a dire, che c'era stata una violazione di un dovere procedurale di promuovere uguaglianza dell'opportunità); sui motivi dell'irrazionalità; e sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 lettura insieme con Articolo 14. In relazione alla terza base, i richiedenti addussero, che loro furono discriminati contro nel loro diritto ad una pensione di esercito sulla base della loro nazionalità di and/or di età. In particolare, loro dibatterono che loro furono trattati differentemente sia dai più giovani soldati di Gurkha che avevano (più) anni di servizio dopo 1 luglio 1997 e da soldati di Esercito britannici e regolari.
34. I richiedenti furono accordati permesso per intraprendere la loro richiesta di controllo giurisdizionale. Un'udienza ebbe luogo ad ottobre 2009. All'ascolta le parti concordate che il cambio del 2009 all'Immigrazione Decide (veda paragrafo 14 sopra) era irrilevante per il fine dei procedimenti.
35. 11 gennaio 2010 la Corte Alta respinse la richiesta su tutti i tre motivi. In riguardo della richiesta di discriminazione di età la Corte Alta si appellò sulla sua più prima decisione in R (Gurung) c. Ministero di Difesa [2008] EWHC 1496 (Admin) (riassunse a paragrafi 45-49 sotto) in che contenne che la differenza in trattamento non accadde quota alla differenza in età ma a causa delle date alle quali era stato reso servizio. Il giudice nei richiedenti presenti la causa di ' notò quel
“quando linee sono disegnate per qualsiasi fine con riferimento a date il risultato può includere bene della discriminazione di età indiretta.”
36. Nel giungere a questa conclusione, la corte respinse l'argomento-avanzò coi richiedenti-che la discriminazione di età dovrebbe essere trattata come un “la persona sospetta” la base.
37. In riguardo della richiesta di discriminazione-su-motivo-di-nazionalità la Corte Alta considerò che fu legato con R (Purja ed Altri) c. Ministero di Difesa [2003] EWCA Civ 1345 (riassunse a paragrafi 41-44 sotto) in che aveva deciso la Corte d'appello che Gurkhas con servizio prima 1 luglio 1997 sia in una posizione marcatamente diversa dagli altri soldati che notificano nell'Esercito britannico prima quel la data. La differenza in disposizioni di pensione riflettè la posizione storica e diversa del Gurkhas. Benché la Corte Alta accettò che il cambio del 2004 nell'Immigrazione Decide (veda paragrafo 13 sopra) minò alcune delle assunzioni che sostengono la decisione in Purja, contenne che i cambi non colpirono il ragionamento della Corte d'appello come che ragionando fece domanda al calcolo di diritti di pensione che accumularono prima 1 luglio 1997. Per tutte le ragioni avanzate col Corte Giudice Alto in Gurung, la Corte Alta considerò, che la scelta di 1 luglio 1997 per marcare il confine per trattamento diverso di pensione accumulata era una razionale e ragionevole.
38. I richiedenti furono accordati permesso per fare appello alla Corte d'appello. Su ricorso, la loro causa fu fissata esclusivamente con riferimento ad Articolo 14 della Convenzione letto insieme con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
39. 13 ottobre 2010 la Corte d'appello respinse i richiedenti il ricorso di '. In riguardo della rivendicazione di discriminazione-su-motivo-di-nazionalità la Corte d'appello, come la Corte Alta si considerò confine con la decisione in Purja (citò sopra). In riguardo della rivendicazione di età-discriminazione la corte, appellandosi sulla sentenza della Corte di Strasbourg in Neill c. il Regno Unito, n. 56721/00, 29 gennaio 2002 contennero che anche se un paragone attinente potrebbe essere disegnato fra più vecchio e più giovane Gurkhas, il Ministero di Difesa potrebbe giustificare facilmente la differenza in trattamento.
40. 13 dicembre 2010 la Corte Suprema rifiutò di accordare il permesso di richiedenti per fare appello.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. R (Purja ed Altri) c. Ministero di Difesa [2003] EWCA Civ 1345
41. In Purja ed Altri che interessato una richiesta al GPS portò prima dei 2004 cambi agli Articoli di Immigrazione ed i GOTT, i reclamanti presentarono, inter l'alia che la differenza in tassi di pensione fra Gurkha e non-Gurkha soldati erano irrazionali e costituirono la discriminazione diretta per motivi della nazionalità.
42. La Corte Alta respinse le loro azioni di reclamo. In relazione all'azione di reclamo di discriminazione, contenne, che la situazione dei soldati di Gurkha su pensionamento non era analoga a che di loro non-Gurkha cose uguale e della differenza in trattamento furono giustificate perciò.
43. I reclamanti fecero appello alla Corte d'appello. Nel respingere il ricorso, Simon che LJ Marrone ha affermato:
“... non solo è Gurkhas, come il giudice là osservato ‘lasciando il Regno Unito e ritornando in Nepal, dove le loro pensioni saranno pagate, e le condizioni in Nepal sono marcatamente diverse da quelli nel Regno Unito ', ma anche si deve tenere presente che queste pensioni sono generalmente pagabili da un'età molto più prima. Se che la considerazione - che il Gurkhas pensioni di ' immediatamente divenute pagabile dopo 15 anni mentre soldati britannici ricevono solamente il loro dopo 22 anni o (in 83% di cause) all'età di 60-sarà riguardato come un) dimostrando che i due gruppi non sono ‘in un analogo o relativamente situazione simile ' o b) offrendo la giustificazione ragionevole od obiettiva ‘' per la distinzione fra i loro rispettivi tassi di pensione, o forse c pari) suggerendo che soldati britannici non sono dopo tutti godendo il trattamento preferenziale di ‘' (tutti queste frasi che sono prese da Stubbings-veda paragrafo 43 sopra), sembra a me una questione di scelta ed ultimamente immateriale.
59. La questione sollevata direttamente con articolo 14 è se i Gurkhas ' assegnano una pensione a diritti sono ‘garantì senza la discriminazione su [il] la base [di] il cittadino... origine ' che alla mia mente traduce nella questione se, in riguardo ad ai loro diritti di pensione, loro sono stati trattati ingiustificabilmente bene di altri a causa del loro essere del Nepal.
60. Si può dire chiaramente che è solamente perché loro sono del Nepal che i Gurkhas andranno in pensione a Nepal e vivranno là più a buon mercato delle loro cose uguale britanniche. Ma io respingo completamente la proposta che loro saranno considerati perciò ingiustificabilmente bene trattata sulla base della loro nazionalità. È, chiaramente, solamente perché loro sono del Nepal che loro sono arruolati nella Brigata di Gurkha nel primo posto. Né io sono entusiasmato con [i rivendicatori '] l'argomento che perché, dica, un irlandesi o giamaicano (duplice) cittadino sarà assolto dall'Esercito britannico con una pensione calcolata senza riferimento a dovunque lui può stare intendendo di andare in pensione, così anche debba un Gurkha. Io non posso riconoscere semplicemente i due gruppi come essendo in ‘un analogo o pertinentemente situazione simile ' che guarda alla natura della Brigata di Gurkha nell'insieme-la base e circostanze del Gurkhas l'assunzione di ', servizio e pagamento.”
44. Chadwick LJ attrasse attenzione a cinque caratteristiche che distinguono la situazione dei soldati di Gurkha da non-Gurkha i soldati:
“84. È abbastanza per attrarre attenzione al seguente: (i) i soldati di Gurkha sono arruolati, esclusivamente, dal Nepal, sotto disposizioni alle quali i governi di Nepal e l'India hanno dato approvazione; (l'ii) i soldati di Gurkha, invariabilmente sono assolti in Nepal alla fine del loro servizio, e ha nessuno diritto di dimora nel Regno Unito; (l'iii) Gurkha fa il soldato volontà, quasi invariabilmente completi il ' di 15 anni riparano e vanno in pensione su pensione (pagabile con effetto immediato) ad o dell'età di 35 anni; (l'iv) c'è un ovvio, e riconobbe, abbia bisogno in quelle circostanze allevare e mantenere collegamenti fra i soldati di Gurkha mentre in servizio ed il paese (il Nepal) a che loro ritorneranno su pensionamento; e (v) che bisogno è migliorato con le differenze sociali, economiche e culturali ed ampie fra Nepal ed il Regno Unito-e fra Nepal e gli altri paesi in tutto il mondo nei quali i soldati di Gurkha sono stati, o è probabile essere, richiesto notificare.
85. Prendendo quelle questioni in considerazione io lo trovo impossibile giungere alla conclusione che le caratteristiche di soldati che notificano in unità di Gurkha nell'Esercito britannico sono così da vicino analoghe alle caratteristiche di soldati che notificano in non-Gurkha unità nello stesso Esercito che le circostanze mandano a chiamare una giustificazione positiva per il trattamento diverso, in relazione a di base paghi ed assegna una pensione a per che prevede Gurkha TACOS. Una volta è apprezzato che ci sono le buon ragioni per il pagamento di una pensione immediata a Gurkha fa il soldato dopo che il ' di 15 anni riparano-come, c'è chiaramente, dato il fatto che i soldati di Gurkha ritorneranno in Nepal sul completamento del loro servizio - piuttosto che una pensione differita pagabile ad età 60 su pensionamento dopo meno che il ' di 22 anni riparano, o una pensione immediata solamente dopo che il ' di 22 anni riparano, sembra ovvio che l'importo della pensione immediata pagabile ai soldati di Gurkha differirà dall'immediato, o il differito, pensione pagabile a non-Gurkha i soldati...”
B. R (Gurung ed Altri) c. Ministero di Difesa [2008] EWHC 1496 (Admin)
45. In Gurung ed Altri che i reclamanti hanno presentato che la politica di pensione adottò col Governo nel GOTT era irrazionale e diede luogo ad una forma della discriminazione di età indiretta. L'Articolo 14 richiesta fu basata solamente sul valore di trasferimento degli anni di servizio di fronte a 1 luglio 1997 e relativo all'effetto che le differenze nel valore di trasferimento crearono fra gruppi di Gurkhas basato su età e sulla loro lunghezza individuale di servizio alle particolari date.
46. Nella sua sentenza la Corte Alta aveva riguardo ad alla difficoltà affrontata con le autorità nel fissare le disposizioni di transizione che seguono la decisione di portare il Gurkhas ' assegna una pensione ad in linea con quelli di altri soldati che notificano nell'Esercito britannico. Affermò:
“Disposizioni di transizione già furono richieste per quelli nel GPS che desidererebbe trasferire. Disposizione doveva essere costituita il Gurkha che andò in pensione dopo 1 luglio 1997 sotto il GPS e già era in ricevuta di che pensione ma che ancora desiderò trasferire all'AFPS. La questione era come la pentola di pensione nel GPS dovrebbe essere trasferita: a valore attuariale o ad un anno per valore di anno o una mistura dei due. Il fatto che i termini di servizio di fronte a 1 luglio 1997, e le disposizioni di pensione, era appropriato per l'assunzione precedente, siccome sostenne Purja, evidentemente crea un problema per quelli cui anni di servizio attraversato quel la data. La prima scelta svaluterebbe gli anni di servizio dopo 1 luglio 1997 con riferimento all'effettivo paghi ricevuto col [universale oltre], e con paragone col valore guadagnato nella loro pensione mette in vaso col resto dell'Esercito britannico a chi, dopo che data, le stesse assunzioni di pensionamento ora potrebbero essere fatte domanda. Il secondo, benché non sé irrazionale, non darebbe al Gurkha traslativo un miglioramento alla sua pensione equo con riferimento al suo valore ma anche con riferimento ad assunzioni inapplicabile di fronte a 1 luglio 1997 quando la pensione o differito paghi fu guadagnato. I terzi che furono adottati rifletterono le differenze nelle assunzioni che furono posto sotto al paghi ed assegni una pensione a disposizioni prima e dopo 1 luglio 1997.
...
Una distinzione all'interno della Brigata fra paghi ed assegni una pensione a prima e dopo 1 luglio 1997 riflette il punto al quale la Brigata di Gurkhas divenne Regno Unito basato, ed il pensionamento data dopo che [permesso indefinito per entrare o rimanere] divenne una scelta. Il più lungo il servizio dopo 1997, il più grande il collegamento personale col Regno Unito e l'allentamento corrispondente delle cravatte col Nepal, il più grande il numero di anni trasferì in un anno per base di anno. L'opposto è anche la causa: il più grande il numero di anni notificò di fronte a 1997, il più grande le cravatte col Nepal. Benché infatti la percentuale di Gurkhas pensionato che viene al Regno Unito dopo che pensionamento fra il 1997 ed il 2004 è davvero molto alto, quel non vuole dire che la disposizione di trasferimento di pensione è irrazionale nel non farlo finanziariamente più facile per loro fare così. Il sistema è una riflessione grezza del grado delle cravatte con entrambi paese dove potrebbe essere goduto pensionamento. L'anno per trasferimento di anno di tutti i diritti di pensione di quelli che vanno in pensione dopo 1 luglio 1997 creerebbe una distinzione acuta fra quelli Gurkhas che andarono in pensione prima e dopo che data in riguardo di anni di servizio di fronte a quel la data.
...
Lo scopo del GOTT era non permettere al Gurkha di andare in pensione nel Regno Unito su una Pensione Immediata a 33 anni vecchio libero da ulteriore lavori, né ora permettere gli altri membri delle Forze Armate di fare così sotto l'AFPS. Né sé per fu richiedere pensionato o notificando Gurkhas per precedere la pensione immediata alla quale il loro TACOS li aveva dati un titolo a, in ordine che all'età di 60 anni o 65 loro riceverebbero la pensione conservata sotto l'AFPS che è tutti che il ' di 15 anni riparano li avrebbe dati un titolo ad a.”
47. Con riguardo ad alla questione la discriminazione maggiorenne, la corte contenne:
“I motivi della differenziazione qui, caratterizzò completamente non adattamente come quelli maggiorenne, non è i motivi di persona sospetta. I motivi della differenza non sorgono perché qualcuno è sopra o sotto una particolare età, ma perché l'introduzione di cambi che non hanno direttamente età riferì è definito con date, ed anni di servizio. Il disegno di linee, con riferimento a date circa schemi che aiutano alcuni ma non altri è una parte inevitabile di molto legislativo o politica cambia; questo è il più così dove un svantaggio passato o anche male è rimediato a retrospettivamente. Chiaramente, questo vuole dire che il più vecchio o più giovane sarà colpito; la data stessa importerà una differenziazione indiretta su motivi di età. Ma quel è un punto iniziale e debole per un'asserzione della discriminazione indiretta su motivi di età. In qualsiasi l'evento, se c'è una base razionale per la selezione della data come a che sono resi i cambi, che si sbarazza dell'Articolo 14 richiesta.”
48. Avendo riguardo ad al margine generoso della valutazione dove è politica pressocché sociale ed economica la decisione, particolarmente quelli si preoccuparono della distribuzione equa di risorse pubbliche, la corte concluse siccome segue:
“Una linea fu disegnata; quel era in se stesso ragionevole, ed il particolare eletto di date per il suo disegno è ragionevole anche. La differenza non riflette età nella realtà ma il numero di anni di servizio basato nell'Estremo Oriente o nel Regno Unito. Se c'era discriminazione indiretta per motivi maggiorenne o ‘l'altro status ', fu giustificato e proporzionato.”
49. Di conseguenza, la Corte Alta respinse la richiesta per controllo giurisdizionale.
LA LEGGE
IO. QUESTIONE PREGIUDIZIALE: VITTIMA STATUS
50. È necessario per rivolgere all'inizio la questione del “la vittima” status del primo richiedente. La Gurkha Welfare Società britannica è un non organizzazione governativa, comprised di 399 Gurkhas pensionati che avevano posizione di fronte alle corti nazionali nella causa riguardo alla materia-questione della causa presente. Ciononostante, la Corte ha sostenuto che “la vittima” status deve essere interpretato autonomamente, irrispettoso del suo significato sotto diritto nazionale, e secondo causa-legge stabilita normalmente sarà accordato solamente ad un'associazione se il secondo è stato colpito direttamente con la misura in oggetto (veda Associazione des amis de Santo de di et di Raphaël autres di et di Fréjus c. la Francia (il dec.), n. 45053/98, 29 febbraio 2000; Dayras ed Altri e l'associazione “SOS Sexisme” c. la Francia, (il dec.), n. 65390/01, 6 gennaio 2005; e Grande di di d'Italia di Oriente Palazzo Giustiniani c. l'Italia (no.2), n. 26740/02, § 20 31 maggio 2007).
51. Benché i suoi 399 membri erano “colpì direttamente” col GOTT, la Gurkha Welfare Società britannica non sembra essere stata “colpì direttamente” con la misura nel suo proprio diritto. È perciò dubbioso se può chiedere di essere un “la vittima” delle violazioni allegato all'interno del significato di Articolo 34 della Convenzione. Comunque, in prospettiva delle conclusioni della Corte sui meriti dei richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ', non c'è nessun bisogno di raggiungere qualsiasi conclusione fissa in questo riguardo a.
II. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 14 Di La Convenzione Presa In CONJUCTION Con Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N. 1
52. I richiedenti si lamentarono che il diritto di pensione significativamente più basso di soldati di Gurkha che andarono in pensione o notificarono prima 1 luglio 1997 corrispose a trattamento differenziale sulla base della nazionalità, razza ed età. Loro si lamentarono che la differenza in trattamento non poteva essere giustificata e, come così, rappresentò insieme una violazione di Articolo 14 lettura con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
53. Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 letture siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
54. Articolo 14 letto come segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e le libertà insorse avanti [il] Convenzione sarà garantita senza la discriminazione su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o l'altro status.”
55. Il Governo contestò quegli argomenti.
A. Ammissibilità
1. Il “la discriminazione razziale” l'azione di reclamo
56. Il Governo dibattè che, pertanto come i richiedenti ora cerchi di lamentarsi di discriminazione razziale, loro non sono riusciti ad esaurire via di ricorso nazionali come nessuno simile rivendicazione fu intrapresa di fronte alla Corte Alta o la Corte d'appello.
57. Benché i richiedenti accettarono che nei procedimenti nazionali la dichiarazione di discriminazione razziale fu lasciata cadere infine, loro contesero che nella causa presente il collegamento fra la nazionalità e razza era forte e, come una conseguenza, la Corte non dovrebbe adottare, un eccessivamente approccio formalistico all'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali.
58. La Corte non può accettare l'osservazione di ' i richiedenti. In Articolo 14 della Convenzione “la razza” e “origine nazionale” è identificato come due motivi distinti della discriminazione. È vero che in una causa determinata i due sarebbero “connesse fortemente”; comunque, siccome è probabile che le considerazioni diverse siano attinenti ad ognuno, non segue necessariamente che azioni di reclamo sotto sia i motivi staranno in piedi o incorreranno insieme. Di conseguenza, l'esistenza di qualsiasi simile “il collegamento” fra i due motivi un richiedente non può assolvere dal sollevare separatamente ognuno di fronte alle corti nazionali.
59. Di conseguenza, determinato che i richiedenti, con la loro propria ammissione non intrapresero la loro rivendicazione della discriminazione sui motivi di razza di fronte alle corti nazionali, questa parte della loro azione di reclamo deve essere respinta come inammissibile in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 1 e 4 della Convenzione per insuccesso per esaurire via di ricorso nazionali (veda, per esempio, Vukovi ?ed Altri c. Serbia (eccezione preliminare) [GC], N. 17153/11 e 29 altri, § 72 25 marzo 2014).
2. Le azioni di reclamo rimanenti
60. La Corte considera che i richiedenti ' azioni di reclamo rimanenti (vale a dire, quelli che concernono trattamento differenziale per motivi della nazionalità ed età) sollevi problemi sufficientemente complessi di fatto e diritto, così che loro non possono essere respinti manifestamente come mal-fondò all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Si soddisfa inoltre che loro non sono inammissibili su qualsiasi l'altra base. Loro devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
B. Meriti
1. L'approccio generale della Corte in Articolo 14 cause
61. La Corte ha sostenuto ripetutamente che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non garantisce come simile qualsiasi diritto per divenire il proprietario di proprietà; né garantisce, come così qualsiasi diritto ad una pensione di un particolare importo (veda, fra molte autorità, Andrejeva c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 55707/00, § 77 ECHR 2009). Comunque, se un Stato Contraente decide di creare un schema di pensione, deve fare così in una maniera che è compatibile con Articolo 14 (veda Stec ed Altri, citato sopra, § 55).
62. Come stabilito nella causa-legge della Corte, solamente differenze in trattamento basato su una caratteristica identificabile o “lo status”, è capace di corrispondere alla discriminazione all'interno del significato di Articolo 14 (veda Kjeldsen, Busk Madsen e Pedersen c. la Danimarca, 7 dicembre 1976, § 56 la Serie Un n. 23). Inoltre, in ordine per un problema per derivare Articolo 14 sotto ci deve essere una differenza nel trattamento di persone in analogo, o pertinentemente simile, situazioni (veda D.H. ed Altri c. la Repubblica ceca [GC], n. 57325/00, § 175, ECHR 2007-IV, e Carico c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 13378/05, § 60 ECHR 2008). Tale differenza in trattamento è discriminatoria se non ha giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole; nelle altre parole, se non intraprende un scopo legittimo o se non c'è una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso. Lo Stato Contraente gode un margine della valutazione nel valutare se ed a che misura differenzia in situazioni altrimenti simili giustifici un trattamento diverso (veda Carico, citato sopra, § 60). La sfera di questo margine varierà secondo le circostanze, l'argomento e lo sfondo. Come un articolo generale, ragioni molto pesanti dovrebbero essere fissate spedisce di fronte alla Corte potrebbe riguardare una differenza in trattamento basato esclusivamente sulla base della nazionalità come compatibile con la Convenzione (veda Gaygusuz c. l'Austria, 16 settembre 1996, § 42 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996 IV, ed Andrejeva c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 55707/00, § 87 ECHR 2009). Ad un margine ampio di solito è concesso comunque, allo Stato sotto la Convenzione quando viene a misure generali della strategia economica o sociale. A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per apprezzare che che è nell'interesse pubblico su motivi sociali o economici, e la Corte rispetterà la scelta di politica della legislatura generalmente a meno che è “manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole” (veda Carson ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 42184/05, § 61, ECHR 2010 e Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 52 ECHR 2006-VI).
63. La Corte osserva all'inizio che, come con la maggior parte se non tutte le azioni di reclamo della discriminazione allegato in un welfare o sistema di pensioni, il problema di fronte a sé per la considerazione va alla compatibilità del sistema con Articolo 14, non ai fatti individuali o circostanze dei particolari richiedenti o di altri che sono o sarebbero colpiti con la legislazione (veda, per esempio, Carson ed Altri, citato sopra, § 62; Stec ed Altri, citato sopra, §§ 50-67; il Carico, citato sopra, §§ 58-66; ed Andrejeva, citato sopra, §§ 74-92). Piuttosto, il ruolo della Corte deve determinare la questione di principio, vale a dire se la legislazione come così illegalmente discrimina fra persone che sono in una situazione analoga (Carson ed Altri, citato sopra, § 62).
2. L’applicazione alla causa presente
64. Il Governo ha accettato che i fatti che sono posto sotto all'azione di reclamo presente incorrono all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Inoltre, loro non contestano che la nazionalità ed età sono proteggute motivi della discriminazione.
65. Di conseguenza che che è in controversia nella causa presente è se c'era una differenza nel trattamento di persone in situazioni pertinentemente simili; e, in tal caso, se che la differenza in trattamento avuto qualsiasi obiettivo e la giustificazione ragionevole.
(un) la Discriminazione sui motivi di origine nazionale
(i) I richiedenti le osservazioni di '
66. Nei richiedenti l'osservazione di ', loro erano stati trattati unfavourably comparato con non-Gurkha soldati nell'Esercito britannico di una fila equivalente e posiziona, con chi loro avevano sostenuto spalla per prendere sulle spalle, notificando la stessa causa, difendendo la stessa nazione, ed affrontando gli stessi rischi e pericoli con lo stesso valore, impegno, passione e dedicazione; e questa differenza in trattamento era su conto della loro nazionalità del Nepal.
67. In particolare, i richiedenti sostennero che i loro diritti di pensione erano meno favorevoli di quelli di non-Gurkha soldati nell'Esercito britannico, come il loro servizio prima di 1 luglio 1997 fu valutato a non più di ventitrè per cento del servizio di altri soldati che notificano allo stesso tempo. I richiedenti non accettarono i contenuti del rapporto attuariale presentati col Governo (veda paragrafo 70 sotto) che suggerì che la maggioranza di loro non sarebbe stata in una posizione significativamente migliore li avuti stato trattato come se loro fossero membri dell'AFPS sempre. In risposta, i richiedenti presentarono il loro proprio rapporto attuariale che fa commenti sui dati, la metodologia ed assunzioni assunsero nel rapporto del Governo. I richiedenti che l'attuario di ' ha indicato che i paragoni si appellarono su nel rapporto del Governo era “solamente una sola fotografia istantanea dalla quale dipende sia il tempo al quale è calcolato e le supposizioni che sono fatte.” Nelle altre parole, siccome i calcoli attinenti dipesero da assunzioni relativo a cambi e durata presunta della vita, risultati diversi si vedrebbero se le supposizioni fossero fatte ad un tempo diverso.
68. I richiedenti dibatterono inoltre che non c'era giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole per la differenza in trattamento. In questo riguardo, loro considerarono il fatto che, prima di 1 luglio 1997, la base di casa della Brigata era stata a Hong Kong (e prima che, Malaya) essere immateriale come la Brigata era eleggibile per spiegamento sempre su qualsiasi missione di Esercito britannica in qualsiasi paese nel mondo. Similmente, loro contesero che il fatto che Gurkhas andò in pensione storicamente a Nepal non fu connesso logicamente alla pensione che loro dovrebbero ricevere per il servizio che loro hanno reso. Una volta fu ammesso che Gurkhas notificò l'Esercito britannico nello stesso modo come gli altri soldati, era la logica inevitabile che loro dovrebbero ricevere la stessa pensione. Questo fu dato particolarmente così che una pensione era una forma di differito paghi, e da dove viene un lavoratore e come loro spendono il loro reddito dovrebbe essere irrilevante al livello di rimunerazione che loro ricevono.
69. Infine, i richiedenti contesero che era considerato che la discriminazione sui motivi della nazionalità avesse “status specialmente protetto” e perciò “ragioni molto pesanti” sarebbe richiesto con modo della giustificazione. Il Governo non poteva, perciò, si appelli su considerazioni budgetarie per giustificare differentemente trattamento i richiedenti dagli altri membri dell'Esercito britannico. Similmente, il fatto che Gurkhas poteva scelse di andare in pensione in Nepal non era un fattore attinente, come il tasso di pensione dovrebbe essere esposto con riferimento per lavorare fatto e non alle scelte di vita di una persona.
(l'ii) le osservazioni di Il Governo
70. Il Governo presentò un rapporto col Settore Attuariale e Statale (“GAD”) quale indicò che la maggior parte dei richiedenti ora non sarebbero stati in una posizione significativamente migliore se loro fossero stati trattati come se loro fossero state membri dell'AFPS sempre. Questo era perché pagamenti di pensione sotto il GPS immediatamente erano pagabili su pensionamento, mentre una pensione immediata sotto l'AFPS era solamente pagabile dopo che il ' di ventidui anni riparano e la maggior parte (non-Gurkha) personale di esercito non notificò quel da molto. Di conseguenza, la maggior parte dei richiedenti riceverebbero pagamenti di pensione per più di venticinqui anni prima di molti non-Gurkha soldati della stessa fila e lunghezza di servizio qualificherebbero per qualsiasi pagamenti sotto l'AFPS. Secondo il Governo, una pensione immediata all'età di trenta-tre non valeva necessariamente meno che una più grande, differita pensione all'età di 60. Infatti, il rapporto di GAD indicò che dei 308 richiedenti il Ministero di Difesa era stato in grado identificare, approssimativamente quattro per cento sarebbero stati in una migliore posizione li avuti stato trattato come membri dell'AFPS in tutto il loro servizio. Questo gruppo consistè soprattutto di ufficiali che immediatamente sarebbero stati concessi ai benefici di AFPS su pensionamento.
71. Pertanto come questa piccola minoranza di richiedenti era stato la materia di trattamento differenziale ed avverso nel modo che le loro pensioni sono state calcolate per periodi di servizio prima di 1 luglio 1997, il Governo ammise che la differenza era sui motivi della nazionalità. Comunque, loro contesero che o non si poteva dire che i richiedenti siano in, un pertinentemente posizione simile agli altri soldati nell'Esercito britannico in relazione all'accumulazione dei loro diritti di pensione per periodi di servizio prima di 1 luglio 1997, o, se loro fossero, la differenza in trattamento aveva una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole.
72. In particolare, loro notarono che, sino ai cambi agli Articoli di Immigrazione nel 2004 e 2009, Gurkhas pensionato non aveva nessun diritto per stabilire nel Regno Unito dopo la fine del loro servizio. Fu presunto perciò che loro andrebbero in pensione in Nepal, dove i loro GPS assegnano una pensione a sarebbe pagato più primo di una pensione di AFPS e, determinato la differenza significativa fra le condizioni economiche nei due paesi, nei veri termini, è molto più prezioso che le somme equivalenti pagarono nel Regno Unito.
73. Benché il Governo accettò che una pensione era una forma di differito paghi, loro indicarono che i richiedenti avevano “acquisì definitivamente” la porzione attinente dei loro diritti di pensione prima di 1 luglio 1997, ad un tempo quando la base di casa della Brigata non era nel Regno Unito, loro non avevano diritto a servizio accompagnato là, e loro avevano nessuno diritto stabilire su pensionamento là. Di conseguenza, loro avevano cravatte molto limitate al Regno Unito durante questo periodo. Il Governo respinse i richiedenti asserzione di ' che paga potrebbe essere esposta solamente legalmente con riferimento per lavorare si impegnato, con la conseguenza che il posto dove il lavoratore stava ricevendo suo paghi (e con proroga, la sua pensione) era irrilevante. Sul contrario, la molta pubblico-servizio e lavori di privato-settore nel Regno Unito avuti un “appesantimento Londinese” riflettere il costo più alto di vivere in quel la città.
74. In qualsiasi la causa, il Governo indicò che benché molti Gurkhas ora furono concessi per stabilire nel Regno Unito, loro non furono obbligati per fare così: diversamente da qualsiasi l'altro soldato nell'Esercito britannico, loro trattennero il diritto per andare in pensione in Nepal. Di conseguenza, il Governo dibattè che non fu obbligato per procurare un aumento completamente retrospettivo nelle loro pensioni su una base di anno-per-anno sull'assunzione che loro sceglierebbero di stabilire nel Regno Unito piuttosto che casa di ritorno. Questa era la causa data specialmente che molto Gurkhas che optò di stabilire nel Regno Unito seguì a godere una seconda carriera che produsse un reddito dal quale loro potrebbero soddisfare le loro spese viventi là.
75. Infine, il Governo contese che la causa presente sollevò problemi di politica sociale ed economica, ed in simile cause la Corte normalmente rispettò la scelta di politica della legislatura a meno che era “manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole” (Stec, citato sopra, § 52). Come in Stec, il Governo stava tentando di mettere diritto un'ineguaglianza e la sua scelta di politica nel fare così non era “manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole.” Questo specialmente fu dato così che, per le ragioni già identificate, che scelta di politica era né irragionevole né arbitraria. Nel concedere diritti di pensione accumulati in riguardo di anni di servizio dopo 1 luglio 1997 per essere trasferito all'AFPS su una base di anno-per-anno, il Governo creò efficacemente inoltre, un'eccezione alla sua politica generale di non-retrospectivity quando venne al miglioramento di schemi di pensione. Comunque, il costo di equalising tutti gli anni di servizio prima di luglio 1997 per membri della Brigata in servizio su che data avrebbe costato un GBP 320 milione supplementare, mentre prolungando il GOTT ad ogni Gurkhas, incluso quelli che andarono in pensione prima 1 luglio 1997 e valutando il loro servizio su una base di anno-per-anno avrebbe costato nella regione di GBP 1.5 miliardo più di venti anni. Inoltre, tale approccio, se è adottato, avrebbe condotto beneficiari di altri schemi di settore pubblici a lamentarsi del non-retrospectivity di qualsiasi miglioramenti nei loro propri schemi.
(iii) la valutazione di La Corte
(?) “La differenza in trattamento”
76. La Corte ha stabilito nella sua causa-legge che, in ordine per un problema la prima condizione è derivare Articolo 14 sotto, che ci deve essere una differenza nel trattamento di persone in situazioni pertinentemente simili.
77. Al giorno d'oggi la causa i soldati di Gurkha furono trattati indubbiamente differentemente dagli altri soldati nell'Esercito britannico in riguardo del loro diritto ad una pensione poiché, prima di 1997, loro furono governati con un schema di pensione diverso dagli altri soldati nell'Esercito britannico, con clausole e condizioni diversi. In oltre, per quegli eleggibile per trasferimento all'AFPS, diritti solamente accumulati ad una pensione per anni di servizio dopo 1 luglio 1997 furono trasferiti su una base di anno-per-anno, mentre accumulò diritti in riguardo di anni di servizio prima di che data fu trasferita a valore attuariale (approssimativamente ventitrè a trenta-sei percento del valore del servizio di un anno di un non-Gurkha soldato di fila equivalente-veda paragrafo 27 sopra). Comunque, la nozione della discriminazione implica che il gruppo in oggetto non solo fu trattato differentemente, ma anche meno favourably (veda, per esempio, Elsholz c. la Germania [GC], n. 25735/94, §§ 60-61 ECHR 2000 VIII), e nella causa presente il Governo contende che questo criterio non fu soddisfatto come la maggioranza enorme di Gurkhas (sia quelli che andarono in pensione prima 1 luglio 1997 e quelli su che andarono in pensione o dopo che data) non sarebbe stato in un significativamente meglio posizione finanziaria se loro fossero stati trattati come se loro fossero stati nell'AFPS sempre.
78. Questa osservazione seconda del Governo è basata sul rapporto attuariale del GAD che è contestato coi richiedenti che hanno presentato il loro proprio rapporto attuariale che impugna i dati, la metodologia ed assunzioni assunto nel rapporto di GAD (veda paragrafo 67 sopra). Se o non i richiedenti le eccezioni di ' in questo riguardo sono giustificate, la Corte nota che i GAD riportano espressamente accetta che Gurkha fa il soldato di fila di ufficiale o sopra (rudemente quattro per cento del totale) sarebbe stato in un significativamente meglio posizione finanziaria li aveva stato in grado trasferire tutti gli anni di servizio all'AFPS su una base di anno-per-anno. Inoltre, nella revisione del 2004 condotta col Ministro di Stato per Difesa che è stato concesso che Gurkhas generalmente sia “chiaramente” offese sotto il GPS nel contesto cambiato di una seconda carriera probabile nel Regno Unito, in che il GPS pagò “somma troppo piccolo essere utile ad un tempo quando [il Gurkha] non abbia bisogno di loro ed una pensione inadeguata ad età di pensionamento” (veda paragrafo 23 sopra). Perciò, anche se la somma totale di pagamenti di pensione ricevette con un Gurkha che non era di fila di ufficiale non sarebbe stato meno che la somma totale ricevette con suo non-Gurkha la cosa uguale, le autorità hanno ammesso che che che la revisione del 2004 chiamò il diversa “profili di beneficio di pensione” dei soldati di Gurkha era meno vantaggioso. La Corte si soddisfa perciò che i soldati di Gurkha possono essere riguardati siccome stato stato trattato meno favourably in riguardo del loro diritto di pensione che gli altri soldati nell'Esercito britannico.
(?) “Persone in situazioni pertinentemente simili”
79. Articolo 14 richiede anche che in qualsiasi la differenza in trattamento è fra persone “pertinentemente situazioni simili.” In questo riguardo a, la Corte nota che la situazione storica del Gurkhas era molto diversa da che di altri soldati nell'Esercito britannico siccome loro furono basati nell'Estremo Oriente, non aveva cravatte al Regno Unito, e nessuna aspettativa di stabilire seguendo il loro pagamento là. La loro situazione è cambiata significativamente comunque, col tempo. 1 luglio 1997 la loro base di casa si trasferì più importantemente, al Regno Unito (veda paragrafo 8 sopra); nel 2004 gli Articoli di Immigrazione furono corretti per concedere Gurkhas con almeno il ' di quattro anni ripari andando in pensione su o dopo 1 luglio 1997 fare domanda per accordo nel Regno Unito dopo pagamento (veda paragrafo 13 sopra); nel 2006 la politica su Servizio Accompagnato e Sposato fu cambiata, mentre permettendo le mogli e figli dei soldati di Gurkha di formare anche cravatte al Regno Unito (veda paragrafo 9 sopra); e nel 2009 gli Articoli di Immigrazione furono corretti di nuovo infine, per permettere tutti i soldati di Gurkha con almeno il ' di quattro anni ripari fare domanda per accordo nel Regno Unito (veda paragrafo 14 sopra).
80. In prospettiva di questi sviluppi, la Corte accetta, che con la data del GOTT, vale a dire 2007 (veda paragrafo 25 sopra), i soldati di Gurkha erano in un “pertinentemente situazione simile” agli altri soldati nell'Esercito britannico.
(?) “Obiettivamente e ragionevolmente giustificò”
81. È base comune che dove era sui motivi della nazionalità una differenza allegato in trattamento (veda paragrafo 71 sopra), ragioni molto pesanti dovevano essere fissate spedisce prima che può essere riguardato come compatibile con la Convenzione (veda Gaygusuz, citato sopra, § 42, ed Andrejeva, citato sopra, § 87). Comunque, nel considerare se simile “ragioni molto pesanti” esista, la Corte deve essere attenta del margine ampio concesso allo Stato sotto la Convenzione di solito quando viene a misure generali della strategia economica o sociale. Quel è particolarmente così dove una differenza allegato in trattamento stato il risultato di una misura di transizione che forma parte di un schema per il miglioramento di un beneficio che fu eseguito in buon fede per correggere un'ineguaglianza. Per esempio, in Neill ed Altri c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 56721/00 29 gennaio 2002, la Corte riconobbe che, nel costituire disposizione il pagamento futuro di pensioni di servizio a membri delle Forze Armate ed alle loro vedove, autorità nazionali erano in principio permesso di restringere diritto a simile pensioni a quelli che erano ancora in servizio al tempo di introduzione delle disposizioni nuove, e fissare il livello di diritto con riferimento al periodo di servizio completò introduzione seguente delle disposizioni attinenti.
82. Al giorno d'oggi causa, seguendo un numero degli sviluppi esposto fuori a paragrafo 79 sopra le autorità accettarono (nel 2004) che la situazione di Gurkhas era cambiata, così che le differenze nella maggioranza dei loro clausole e condizioni di servizio (incluso il loro diritto di pensione) potrebbe essere giustificato più su motivi legali e morali (veda paragrafo 22 sopra). Come una conseguenza, il GOTT del 2007 fu formulato per per portare Gurkhas ', assegna una pensione ad in linea con quelli di altri soldati nell'Esercito britannico. Comunque, avendo deciso di permettere al Gurkhas di trasferire all'AFPS, le autorità furono affrontate con una decisione: se concedere il trasferimento all'AFPS di diritti di pensione accumulò in riguardo di tutti gli anni di servizio su una base di anno-per-anno; se concedere solamente il trasferimento di diritti di pensione accumulato in riguardo di tutti gli anni di servizio su una base attuariale; o trovare una base media.
83. Sembrerebbe che la prima scelta fu respinta per ragioni finanziarie: il Governo ha valutato il costo di equalising tutti gli anni di servizio prima di 1997 in questo riguardo, per ogni Gurkhas che notifica su che data per essere nella regione di GBP 320 milione, ed il costo di prolungare il GOTT a quelli Gurkhas che andarono in pensione prima che data (con diritti di pensione accumulati valutati su una base di anno-per-anno) essere GBP 1.5 miliardo più di venti anni. La seconda scelta fu respinta anche, perché avrebbe svalutato quegli anni di servizio acquisito ad un tempo quando l'assunzione storica che i Gurkhas non andrebbero in pensione più a Nepal contenne buona. Di conseguenza, le autorità optarono per il terzo approccio, mentre concedendo solamente il trasferimento di diritti di pensione accumulato dopo 1 luglio 1997 su una base di anno-per-anno, e, nel fare così, fece un'eccezione alla loro politica generale di non migliorare retrospettivamente schemi di pensione.
84. La selezione di 1 luglio 1997 come un “il punto di rottura” non era arbitrario. Questa data rappresentò il trasferimento del Gurkhas base di casa di ' al Regno Unito ed era perciò la data da che il Gurkhas cominciare che forma cravatte con quel il paese. Quelli che andarono in pensione prima che data non aveva cravatte al Regno Unito e, alla data del GOTT (2007), aveva nessuno diritto stabilire là. Benché questo cambiasse seguente l'emendamento del 2009 all'Immigrazione Decide, i richiedenti convennero di fronte alle corti nazionali che questo sviluppo-quale posto-datato sia il GOTT ed il principio dei procedimenti nazionali nella causa presente-era irrilevante (veda paragrafo 34 sopra). Di conseguenza, la Corte non trova nessuna causa per dubitare la conclusione della revisione del 2004 che il GPS ha continuato ad essere il più buon schema per soddisfare le necessità di questi Gurkhas, fin dai pagamenti sotto che schema che immediatamente era disponibile su pensionamento sia più che adeguato prevedere per pensionamento loro in Nepal (veda paragrafo 23 sopra).
85. Per quelli Gurkhas che andarono in pensione dopo 1 luglio 1997 prima di qualsiasi diritto di pensione accumulò che data fu accumulata ad un tempo quando loro non avevano cravatte al Regno Unito e nessuna aspettativa di stabilire seguendo il loro pagamento dall'Esercito là. È vero che la maggioranza di Gurkhas che incorre in questa categoria stabilì successivamente nel Regno Unito (veda paragrafo 13 sopra). Ciononostante, in in considerazione dell'impatto del GOTT sulla loro situazione finanziaria, deve essere tenuto presente, che il fine di un schema di pensione di forze armate (o sotto l'AFPS o GPS) era non abilitare il soldato per vivere senza le altre fonti di reddito pensionamento seguente dall'Esercito. Dato che la maggior parte di Gurkhas andò in pensione dopo quindici anni, e la maggioranza di altri soldati nell'Esercito britannico andato in pensione prima che loro notificavano da ventidui anni, si fu aspettato pienamente che loro continuerebbero ad essere economicamente attivo ed avere una volta le altre fonti di reddito loro lasciarono le forze armate. Infatti, la prova presentata col Governo indica che molti di quelli Gurkhas che andarono in pensione dopo 1 luglio 1997 e che rimasero nel Regno Unito hanno seguito a trovare l'altro lavoro lucrativo là (veda paragrafo 74 sopra).
86. Diversamente da situazione in Neill (citò sopra), il Gurkhas ' assegna una pensione a sotto il GPS fu indice-collegato al loro aspettato paese di pensionamento. Comunque, la Corte non trova appoggio per i richiedenti argomento di ' nel quale pensioni non dovrebbero essere indice-collegate così. In Carson (citò sopra, § 86) la Corte riconobbe espressamente che era difficile disegnare qualsiasi paragone genuino fra la posizione di pensionati che vivono in paesi diversi su conto della serie di variabili economiche e sociali che fanno domanda da paese a paese. Nelle loro osservazioni alla Corte, le parti hanno concordato inoltre, che pensioni sono una forma di salario differito, e molti datori di lavoro-sia al nazionale e livello internazionale- regolarmente aggiusti salari per riflettere il costo di vivere nella città o paese di lavoro.
87. In luce delle sentenze summenzionate, la Corte considera, che pertanto siccome i richiedenti si sono lamentati della discriminazione sui motivi di nazionalità qualsiasi la differenza in trattamento era obiettivamente e ragionevolmente giustificati. Di conseguenza, nessuna violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 può essere trovato sui fatti della causa presente.
(b) la Discriminazione su motivi maggiorenne
88. La Corte ha riconosciuto che è probabile che età costituisca “l'altro status” per i fini di Articolo 14 della Convenzione (veda, per esempio, Schwizgebel c. la Svizzera, n. 25762/07, § 85 ECHR 2010 (gli estratti)), benché non ha, datare, suggerì che la discriminazione su motivi maggiorenne dovrebbe essere associato a con altro “la persona sospetta” i motivi della discriminazione. Ciononostante, anche se fu accettato che “più vecchio” Gurkhas fu trattato meno favourably che “più giovane” Gurkhas su conto della loro età, il trattamento differenziale che anche fluisce dalla decisione di valutare solamente servizio dopo 1 luglio 1997 su un “anno-per-anno” la base, deve essere riguardato obiettivamente e ragionevolmente come giustificò per le ragioni date in relazione ai richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di ' riguardo alla discriminazione sui motivi della nazionalità (veda divide in paragrafi 82-87 sopra).
89. Le considerazioni precedenti sono sufficienti per abilitare la Corte per concludere che i richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di ' riguardo alla discriminazione di età rivela anche nessuna violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione letta insieme con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo riguardo alla discriminazione sui motivi di origine nazionale ed età ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;

2. Sostiene che c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione letta insieme con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 15 settembre, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Abel Campos Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska
Cancelliere Presidente

 
Copyright 2007 - Risoluzione 1024x768